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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Culpeper in Culpeper County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Battle of Cedar Mountain

 
 
The Battle of Cedar Mountain Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
1. The Battle of Cedar Mountain Marker
Inscription. On August 9, 1862, a Confederate army under "Stonewall" Jackson fought a hot engagement here in the shadow of Cedar Mountain against a Federal force commanded by the brashly confident John Pope. Jackson's army was much stronger, but a bold Federal advance nearly routed the Confederates. When Jackson's reserves under A.P. Hill arrived they stabilized the front and then steadily drove the Union army from the field. Although his brilliant exploits as Lee's right arm were to continue for the nine remaining months of his life, Cedar Mountain was the last battle "Stonewall" commanded on his own.
 
Erected by The Culpeper Cavalry Museum.
 
Location. 38° 24.306′ N, 78° 4.121′ W. Marker is near Culpeper, Virginia, in Culpeper County. Marker is at the intersection of General Winder Road (County Route 657) and James Madison Highway (U.S. 15), on the right when traveling west on General Winder Road. Touch for map. Located at the pull-off and trail head for the Civil War Preservation Trust's Cedar Mountain Battlefield walking trail. Marker is in this post office area: Culpeper VA 22701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Hand-to-Hand Fighting (a few steps from this marker); a different marker
Several Markers at the Cedar Mountain Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
2. Several Markers at the Cedar Mountain Battlefield
also named The Battle of Cedar Mountain (a few steps from this marker); Cedar Mountain (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Cedar Mountain (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Cedar Mountain (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Cedar Mountain (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named The Battle of Cedar Mountain (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named The Battle of Cedar Mountain (about 800 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Culpeper.
 
Regarding The Battle of Cedar Mountain. This is one of several markers interpreting the Battle of Cedar Mountain. See the Battle of Cedar Mountain Virtual Tour by Markers linked below.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Cedar Mountain. National Park Service summary of the battle and driving tour. The marker is at the first tour stop. (Submitted on December 31, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
Gordon's Federal Brigde Faces A.P. Hill's Reinforcements image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
3. Gordon's Federal Brigde Faces A.P. Hill's Reinforcements
From a point on the optional trail, looking west. On the far west flank of the battle Federal General Gordon H. Gordon's Brigade advanced to support Crawford's attack. When Confederate General A.P. Hill's division arrived, Brigades under General James Archer and William Pender attacked down the slope here and drove the Federals back.
 

2. Battle of Cedar Mountain - Culpeper Cavalry Museum. Established in 1975 as the Culpeper Cavalry Museum, the Museum of Culpeper has expanded its charter beyond just Civil War topics. (Submitted on December 31, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Battle of Cedar Mountain Virtual Tour by Markers. A set markers that document the Battle of Cedar Mountain, August 9, 1862. (Submitted on January 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 31, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,535 times since then and 66 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on December 31, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on December 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on January 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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