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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Pisgah in Tazewell County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Big Crab Orchard Or Witten’s Fort

 
 
Big Crab Orchard Or Witten’s Fort Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 28, 2011
1. Big Crab Orchard Or Witten’s Fort Marker
Inscription. On the hillside to the south stood Big Crab Orchard Fort, also known as Witten’s Fort. Thomas Witten obtained land here in 1771 and built the fort as a neighborhood place of refuge. It was garrisoned in Dunmore’s War, 1774.
 
Erected 1929 by Conservation & Development Commission. (Marker Number XY-14.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia, Clinch River Forts Circa 1774 marker series.
 
Location. 37° 7.174′ N, 81° 34.412′ W. Marker is in Pisgah, Virginia, in Tazewell County. Marker is at the intersection of Trail of the Lonesome Pine (U.S. 19) and Frog Level Road (Business U.S. 19), on the left when traveling west on Trail of the Lonesome Pine. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Tazewell VA 24651, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Pisgah United Methodist Church (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Indian-Settler Conflicts (approx. 1.7 miles away); Tazewell (approx. 2.7 miles away); Roark’s Gap Incident (approx. 2.7 miles away); William Wynne’s Fort
Big Crab Orchard Or Witten’s Fort Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 28, 2011
2. Big Crab Orchard Or Witten’s Fort Marker
Pisgah United Methodist Church (described on marker X-25)is in the distance on the right.
(approx. 4.4 miles away); Mathias Harman, Sr. (approx. 4˝ miles away); First Court for Tazewell County (approx. 4.8 miles away); Burke’s Garden (approx. 5.9 miles away).
 
More about this marker. This marker was listed in the first (1929) guide to historical markers, and all subsequent guides through 1994, as marker X-14. It is now listed as XY-14.
 
Additional comments.
1. Following is a List of Men Who Served at Witten (Crab Orchard) Fort
From photograph 4

1774
Samuel Doack
John Lashly
Thos Meads
Daniel Henderson
Jonathan Edwards
Michael Razor
John Campbell
George Dohorty
John Hambleton
David Bustar (Bruster)
Edward Sharp
James Fullen
John Williams
Levi Bishop
Alexander Henderson
John Crafford
Benjamin Redford
Andw. Branstead
Rowland Williams
Thomas Whitten Jr.
Francis Hynes
Thomas Rogers
Wm. King
Jacob Kindar
Peter Kinder
Christian Bergman
Jeremiah Whitton
Isaac Spratt
Andw. Steel
Alexr. Grant
Wm. Thompson
Michael Glaves
James Edwards
Thomas Potter
Robert Manford (Moffett)
Francis
Witten’s Fort image. Click for full size.
By Unknown Photographer, circa 1900
3. Witten’s Fort
I found this picture in my deceased grandparents (Barney and Viola Raines Deel) pictures, which I have now. Those could be some of my relatives at the door.
Hambleton
Isiah Hambleton
George Vant
James Mitchell
Thomas Whitten Sr.
John Grinup

List of Scouts for Upper Clinch Valley
William Bowen
Thos. Maxwell
David Ward
Wm. Priest
Wm. Crabtree
Robt. Davis
James Fowler
Rees Bowan
John Kinkeid
John [illegible]
Sam [illegible]
    — Submitted July 16, 2011.

 
Categories. Settlements & SettlersWars, US Indian
 
Replica of Fort Witten image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 28, 2011
4. Replica of Fort Witten
Fort Witten image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 28, 2011
5. Fort Witten
These plastic plaques are attached to a low pedestal to the right of the door to the replica. The small plaque reads, “replicated in 1926 by the Daughters of the American Revolution and other Tazewell County citizens to honor the pioneer settlers,” followed by the text of the roadside marker. The larger plaque lists the men who served at the fort. The list can be found elsewhere on this page.
Frog Level Service Station, Across from the Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 28, 2011
6. Frog Level Service Station, Across from the Marker
"Since 1932. T.E. Bowling, Jr." This gas station, yacht club, and bar—originally located about 1½ miles south—closed in 2007 when T.E. “June” Bowling died. It was the local gathering spot. Its “tavern” license, the last in Virginia, expired with her death. It allowed beer to be served without having to sell food. It needs its own marker. Google it for an interesting story.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 14, 2011, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,395 times since then and 108 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 14, 2011, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   3. submitted on October 30, 2011, by Scotty Drue Owens of Richmond, Virginia.   4. submitted on July 14, 2011, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   5. submitted on July 16, 2011, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   6. submitted on July 14, 2011, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
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