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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Kansas City in Wyandotte County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Delaware Crossing and the Grinter Ferry

 
 
Delaware Crossing and the Grinter Ferry Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., April 29, 2011
1. Delaware Crossing and the Grinter Ferry Marker
Inscription.
Just east of this marker, at a point where an old Indian trail led to the water's edge, Moses Grinter established the first ferry on the Kansas River. The year was 1831, and Grinter became the earliest permanent white settler in the area. His ferry was used extensively by travelers over the Fort Leavenworth - Fort Scott military road, and by traders, freighters and soldiers traveling between the forts or to Santa Fe. This place was known as Military or Delaware Crossing, and sometimes as Secondine, and here the first non-military post office in Kansas was established on September 10, 1850.

In 1857 Grinter built the large brick house still standing to the north and lived there until his death in 1878. He and his part Delaware wife are buried in the churchyard one-fourth mile beyond. The Union Pacific, Eastern Division, built through here in 1863-1864. In 1869, as the Kansas Pacific it was the first railroad to reach the western border of the state.

The Chouteau family, long prominent in the fur trade, operated posts in this vicinity as early as the 1820's. Delaware, Wyandot, Munsee and Shawnee Indians were among Eastern tribes resettled in this area beginning in 1830. Near here were the Delaware agency, smithy, and Baptist and Methodist missions. By the 1870's remnants of these tribes had been removed to reservations
Delaware Crossing and the Grinter Ferry Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., April 29, 2011
2. Delaware Crossing and the Grinter Ferry Marker
Grinter Place State Historic Site in background. Looking north from Frontage Road.
in present Oklahoma.
 
Erected by State Historical Society and State Highway Commission. (Marker Number 88.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Kansas Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 39° 4.376′ N, 94° 45.552′ W. Marker is in Kansas City, Kansas, in Wyandotte County. Marker is on Kaw Drive (State Highway 32) near 78th Street, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is along the Kaw Drive Frontage Road, about 350 feet south of Grinter Place State Historic Site. Marker is in this post office area: Kansas City KS 66111, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Moses Grinter (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Grinter House (about 500 feet away); Delaware & Wyandot Reserve (approx. 3 miles away); Edwardsville Veterans Memorial (approx. 3.6 miles away); Quantrill's Raid on Shawneetown (approx. 4.2 miles away); Pleasant View Veterans' Memorial (approx. 4.2 miles away); Walker School (approx. 4.2 miles away); Esther E. Brown (approx. 4.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Kansas City.
 
Also see . . .
1. Grinter Place State Historic Site. (Submitted on August 21, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
Grinter Place State Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., April 29, 2011
3. Grinter Place State Historic Site
Home of Moses and Annie Grinter

2. The Kansas Indians in Morgan's History of Wyandotte County (1911). (Submitted on August 21, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Indian History in Cutler's History of the State of Kansas (1883). (Submitted on August 21, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
4. The Fort Leavenworth - Fort Gibson Military Road. (Submitted on August 21, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
5. Grinter Place in Kansapedia. (Submitted on August 21, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNative AmericansSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels
 
Grave Marker for Moses and Annie Grinter image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., April 29, 2011
4. Grave Marker for Moses and Annie Grinter
In Grinter Chapel Methodist Cemetery, near Swartz Road and South 78th Street, about one half mile north of Grinter Place.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 21, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 543 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 21, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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