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Gillisonville in Jasper County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Gillisonville Baptist Church

 
 
Gillisonville Baptist Church Marker (Obverse) image. Click for full size.
By Michael Stroud, January 8, 2008
1. Gillisonville Baptist Church Marker (Obverse)
Inscription. (Obverse): The Euhaw congregation constituted this ecclesiastical group 24 March 1832, naming it Coosawhatchie Baptist Church. The South Carolina Baptist Convention met at the church in December 1845 and unanimously voted to join the recently formed Southern Baptist Convention. In February 1865, General William Tecumseh Sherman's troops visited the church and etched "War of 18621 &62 & 63 & 64 Feb.

(Reverse): 7th 1865 this is done by a Yankee Soldier," on the communion silver. The congregation became Gillisonville Baptist Church 19 November 1885. The 1845 church building, placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, is a local interpretation of Greek Revival style of architecture: notable features include the slave gallery and box pews.
 
Erected 1984 by The Congregation. (Marker Number 27-23.)
 
Location. 32° 36.448′ N, 80° 59.92′ W. Marker is in Gillisonville, South Carolina, in Jasper County. Marker is on U.S. 278 ¼ mile north of South Carolina Highway 462, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Ridgeland SC 29936, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies
Gillisonville Baptist Church Marker (Reverse) image. Click for full size.
By Michael Stroud, January 8, 2008
2. Gillisonville Baptist Church Marker (Reverse)
. Gillisonville (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Coosawhatchie (approx. 4.3 miles away); Battle of Coosawhatchie (approx. 4.4 miles away); Grays Consolidated High School (approx. 4.8 miles away); Oak Grove Baptist Church (approx. 6.1 miles away); Pine Level Baptist Church (approx. 6.7 miles away); General Robert E. Lee (approx. 7.2 miles away); The Battle of Pocotaligo (approx. 7.4 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. National Register Properties in South Carolina entry for Gillisonville Baptist Church. (Submitted on January 11, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.)
2. National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form for Gillisonville Baptist Church. (Submitted on January 11, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Gillisonville Baptist Church
The church and a dwelling are the remains of the old town of Gillisonville (one-time seat of the old Beaufort District), which was burned by Sherman’s Army in 1865.

The church was constituted in 1832 as the summer home of Coosawatchie Baptist Church so it might escape the insects and “fever” of the hot summer months. It was built in 1838 and named Gillisonville Baptist Church in 1885. The Greek Revival style church is sheathed in white clapboard with brick foundation
Gillisonville Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
By Michael Stroud, January 8, 2008
3. Gillisonville Baptist Church
piers. The portico is supported by Doric columns on pedestals, and has a gable roof. The square tower which rises from the gable ridge pole contains two sections. The first is enclosed but possesses a section which may have been open formerly. The second, which contains the bell, is open. Its roof is supported by four round columns. It was apparently constructed by local craftsmen and possesses many original features such as boxed pews, random width flooring, and a former slave balcony in the rear supported by chamfered columns. The church and cemetery is surrounded by ancient moss laden trees.
    — Submitted January 11, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Notable BuildingsNotable EventsWar, US Civil
 
Gillisonville Baptist Church Marker with church in background image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2009
4. Gillisonville Baptist Church Marker with church in background
Gillisonville Baptist Church, today image. Click for full size.
By Michael Stroud, January 8, 2008
5. Gillisonville Baptist Church, today
Gillisonville Baptist Church National Register Of Historic Places Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2009
6. Gillisonville Baptist Church National Register Of Historic Places Marker
At rightside of center door:
Gillisonville Baptist Church (added 1971 - Building - #71000786)
U.S. 278, Gillisonville
Historic Significance: Event,
Architecture/Engineering
Architect, builder, or engineer: Unknown
Architectural Style: Greek Revival
Area of Significance: Architecture, Military
Period of Significance: 1825-1849, 1850-1874
Owner: Private
Historic Function: Religion
Historic Sub-function: Religious Structure
Current Function: Religion
Current Sub-function: Religious Structure
Gillisonville Baptist Church Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2009
7. Gillisonville Baptist Church Cemetery
Gillisonville Baptist Church Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2009
8. Gillisonville Baptist Church Cemetery
General James Washington Moore
Born in Beaufort
District, S.C.
Feb. 25, 1837
Died Dec 27, 1919
——
He touched nothing
he did not adorn

( CSA 2nd Lt., 2nd SC Cavalry, Company C
Later, as State Senator, served as Gen. for State Militia )
Gen. James W. Moore image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2009
9. Gen. James W. Moore
(South Face)
Active participant from
the begining of the war
between the States in the
campaigns of Northern
Virginia, Maryland and
Pennsylvania, and as a
member of the Beaufort
District Troop Hampton
Legion and afterwards
Adjutant 2d Regiment South
Carolina,
Distinguished himself for
Bravery and Efficiency.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 11, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,381 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 11, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   4. submitted on January 30, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   5. submitted on January 11, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on January 30, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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