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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Hunter in Montgomery County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Site of Queen Anne Chapel

 
 
Site of Queen Anne Chapel Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, October 8, 2006
1. Site of Queen Anne Chapel Marker
Inscription.
Site of
Queen Anne Chapel

Built 1711-12 for use of
Mohawk Indians. Torn down
1821 to make way for Erie
Canal

 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Erie Canal marker series.
 
Location. 42° 56.36′ N, 74° 16.91′ W. Marker is in Fort Hunter, New York, in Montgomery County. Marker is on Schoharie Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 129 Schoharie Street, Fort Hunter NY 12069, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Site of Last Mohawk Indian Village (here, next to this marker); Site of Old Fort Hunter (here, next to this marker); Original Erie Canal (here, next to this marker); East Guard Lock (here, next to this marker); A Mohawk House Unearthed (a few steps from this marker); Site of First Bridge (a few steps from this marker); Building Block of the Erie Canal (a few steps from this marker); The Fort by the Village (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Hunter.
 
More about this marker. Three historic markers stood side by side along Schoharie Street adjacent to the old Erie Canal East Guard
Site of Queen Anne Chapel Marker, On Right image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 23, 2007
2. Site of Queen Anne Chapel Marker, On Right
Lock and next door to the Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site Visitors Center. In August of 2011 Hurricane Irene hammered the east coast dropping record levels of rains that created unprecedented flooding in the Schoharie and Mohawk Valleys. Flooding in Schoharie County, New York was reported by the National Weather Service in Albany, New York as five-hundred-year-flood conditions, with roughly 5 to 7 inches of rain in the Schoharie Creek water shed area. The Schoharie Creek overflowed its banks here in Fort Hunter and eroded portions of the roadway and the markers, which were later recovered, presumable so that they might be re-erected.
 
Also see . . .  Old Erie Canal Guard Lock. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Colonial EraNative Americans
 
Site of Queen Anne Chapel Marker, On Left image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, October 8, 2006
3. Site of Queen Anne Chapel Marker, On Left
The stonework and the ditch beyond that, behind the markers, are remaining portions of the original 1825 Erie Canal
Site of Queen Anne Chapel Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 23, 2007
4. Site of Queen Anne Chapel Marker
The three markers stood together. A forth marker stands across the street from the group. In the foreground are the stones of the old Erie Canal East Guard lock. A roadside deck-like viewing platform with interpretive signs overlooked the East Guard Lock, in the upper right.
Site of Queen Anne Chapel Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 1, 2011
5. Site of Queen Anne Chapel Marker
The three markers lie on the lawn across the street from where they stood. The Schoharie Creek flooded this area and washed away part of the road and the area where these markers stood. The front end loader parked on the road serves as a barrier to keep vehicals off this section of unsafe roadway. The Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site visitor center is beyond the loader in the background.
Site of Queen Anne Chapel Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 1, 2011
6. Site of Queen Anne Chapel Marker
The flood waters of the Schoharie Creek not only washed out the three markers and parts of Schoharie Street, but it did some archaeological work on the East Guard Lock, exposing some previously covered stones of the lock.
Flooding on Main Street in Fort Hunter after Hurricane Irene image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, August 29, 2011
7. Flooding on Main Street in Fort Hunter after Hurricane Irene
The volume of water in the Schoharie Creek became larger than the creek bed spilling over into the hamlet of Fort Hunter and taking a short cut to the Mohawk River.
Site of Queen Anne Chapel Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 23, 2015
8. Site of Queen Anne Chapel Marker
View of the "Queen Anne Chapel" marker as it appears in the summer of 2015.
Site of Queen Anne Chapel Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 23, 2015
9. Site of Queen Anne Chapel Marker
View of the marker, leaning against a park storage shed, upside down.
Site of Queen Anne Chapel Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 23, 2015
10. Site of Queen Anne Chapel Marker
View of the marker, leaning against a park storage shed, behind a park maintenance building, in what appears to be a graveyard for all of the park's markers that where damaged in the 2011 flooding.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 18, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 411 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on September 18, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   8, 9, 10. submitted on September 13, 2015, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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