Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Oxon Hill in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The DeButts Family Comes to Maryland - Mount Welby

 

—[Oxon Hill Farm] —

 
<i>Panel 1</i>: The DeButts Family Comes to Maryland Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, October 30, 2011
1. Panel 1: The DeButts Family Comes to Maryland Marker
Inscription.
[Panel 1:] The DeButts Family Comes to Maryland
Samuel DeButts was born in Ireland in 1756. He began a career as a doctor in England and there met and married his wife, Mary Welby, in 1785. Samuel’s medical practice was difficult, unprofitable, and kept the couple apart for weeks at a time. Like hundreds of thousands of other European families, Samuel and Mary DeButts decided to immigrate to the United States.
They arrived with their two children, Richard and Mary Ann, in 1791. They lived in Baltimore, then Washington County, and for a time with Samuel’s brother, John, in St. Mary’s County. Mary gave birth to their third child, John Henry, in the United States.
Samuel and Mary had inherited some wealth and land from their families. In the early 1800s, Samuel decided to add to his income by farming on this land while practicing medicine in Washington, D.C. With this comfortable house and productive farm overlooking the Potomac River, the DeButts family established itself in the society of well-to-do families of the Chesapeake.

[Portraits of:] Samuel and Mary DeButts DeButts, 1805.
(Charles Saint Memin, who engraved these portraits, also engraved the likenesses of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson.)

[Map of the Chesapeake region with locations of the DeButts Family’s
<i>Panel 2</i>: Mount Welby Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, October 30, 2011
2. Panel 2: Mount Welby Marker
homesteads highlighted
:]
Baltimore c.1791-1794
Washington County c. 1795-1810
Washington, D.C./Mount Welby 1811-1843
Trent Hall (Home of John DeButts)

[Panel 2:] Mount Welby
Dr. Samuel DeButts, his wife, Mary Welby DeButt, and their three children lived here in the early 1800s. The house and the property were both known as 'Mount Welby' then, in honor of her family.
The basic design of the house is the same as it was nearly two hundred years ago, but many of the details have changed. The drawing at the right shows how the house likely looked in the DeButts’ time.
The grounds still have a few features that might have survived from the time of the DeButts family. Some of the boxwoods that surround the hexagonal building behind you could be 200 years old.
Pieces of the history of Mount Welby and the DeButts family remain to be discovered. One document mentions a family graveyard somewhere on the farm. The grave site is unknown.

Caution: It is unlawful to dig on National Park Service land.

The grounds still have a few features that might have survived from the time of the DeButts family. Some of the boxwoods that surround the hexagonal building behind you could be 200 years old.
Pieces of the history of Mount Welby and the DeButts family remain to be discovered. One document
"The DeButts Family Comes to Maryland" and "Mount Welby" Marker Panels image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, October 30, 2011
3. "The DeButts Family Comes to Maryland" and "Mount Welby" Marker Panels
- with the Mount Welby house in the background, upper left
mentions a family graveyard somewhere on the farm. The grave site is unknown.

[Illustration captions:]
Mount Welby was designed in the Georgian style with a central hallway on both floors, flanked by rooms on each side.

If you look closely at the house, you can see that the bricks in the walls show two different patterns. On the north, south and west walls, bricks in the lower sections are laid in a Flemish bond pattern. Most likely, these are the oldest parts of the house. The entire east wall and the upper sections of the other three are laid in a pattern called common bond. No one knows for certain why the walls were rebuilt, but a fire is one possibility.

[Background drawing:] Artist’s conception of Mount Welby, early 1800s,
by Barbara S. Mogel.
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 38° 48.125′ N, 77° 0.529′ W. Marker is in Oxon Hill, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker can be reached from Oxon Hill Farm Hiker Trail near Bald Eagle Road, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Bald Eagle Road is accessible south of the the Capital Beltway (I-95/495) from Oxon Hill Road, west of Indian Head Highway (MD 210). Marker is on the grass,
The hexagonal outbuilding and boxwood trees referred to in the text. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, October 30, 2011
4. The hexagonal outbuilding and boxwood trees referred to in the text.
southeast of the "Mount Welby" House. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6411 Oxon Hill Road, Oxon Hill MD 20745, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Burning of Washington, D.C. (a few steps from this marker); Wheat and Tobacco (within shouting distance of this marker); War Comes to Mount Welby (within shouting distance of this marker); Root Cellar (within shouting distance of this marker); Why a Brick Stable? (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); "Rockets on the Hill" (about 400 feet away); Two Centuries of Farm Buildings (about 500 feet away); Sweet Sorghum (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Oxon Hill.
 
Also see . . .  Richard Earle DeButts' Mount Welby II. (Submitted on November 2, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. Oxon Cove Park; tobacco plantation; slavery; "big house"
 
Categories. Antebellum South, USNotable BuildingsNotable PersonsSettlements & Settlers
 
The Mount Welby House, Oxon Hill Farm image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, October 30, 2011
5. The Mount Welby House, Oxon Hill Farm
Samuel DeButts, 1805 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 17, 2011
6. Samuel DeButts, 1805
Close-up of 1805 Charles Saint-Menin portrait on marker
Mary DeButts, 1805 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 17, 2011
7. Mary DeButts, 1805
Close-up of 1805 Charles Saint-Menin portrait on marker
Map of the Chesapeake region with locations of the DeButts Family’s homesteads. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 17, 2011
8. Map of the Chesapeake region with locations of the DeButts Family’s homesteads.
Close-up of map on marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 25, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 1, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 789 times since then and 52 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 1, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   3, 4, 5. submitted on November 2, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   6, 7, 8. submitted on December 24, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement