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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Colmar Manor in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Lincoln Oak

 
 
The Lincoln Oak Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
1. The Lincoln Oak Marker
Inscription. This gnarled and ringed stump, attesting to its age, is all that remains of the majestic oak tree that once shaded the old Spring House.

Steeped in history, it was put to rest by the forces of nature. Its passing will never be forgotten and its existence will be remembered forever as a sentinel over these historic grounds.
 
Location. 38° 55.694′ N, 76° 57.167′ W. Marker is in Colmar Manor, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker can be reached from Bladensburg Road (Maryland Route 450) 0.2 miles west of 38th Avenue, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located within the Fort Lincoln Cemetery, just passed the mauseleum. Marker is in this post office area: Brentwood MD 20722, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Old Spring House ( a few steps from this marker); Fort Lincoln ( within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Lincoln Mausoleum ( about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Battle of Bladensburg ( about 300 feet away); Barney Monument ( about 400 feet away); Little Church of Fort Lincoln ( about 400 feet away); Abraham Lincoln ( about 400 feet away); Living Sculpture ( about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Colmar Manor.
 
Also see . . .
The Lincoln Oak Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
2. The Lincoln Oak Marker
The remains behind the marker is the concrete filler that once supported the hollow trunk.
 High Winds, Heavy Rains down 400 year-old Lincoln Oak. The Deseret News, Sept. 29, 1994. (Submitted on November 23, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraHorticulture & ForestryWar, US Civil
 
Trunk Remains image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
3. Trunk Remains
A few pieces of the trunk remain clinging to the cement filler.
The Old Oak Tree Plaque image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
4. The Old Oak Tree Plaque
Inscription of plaque attached to the spring house:
This old spring house was built by English colonists who in the late years of the 17th century had established a residence close by, climaxing an ocean voyage which ended on the banks ofthe nearby Eastern Branch.
Erected about 1683. The spring house is among the oldest structural relics of the American Colonization Era.
The old oak tree according to qualified judgement was more than 125 years old when the spring house was built.
This venerable old tree has come to be known as 'The Lincoln Oak' because of traditional conferences under its spreading limbs, between President Lincoln and the commanding officers of the nearby fortifications.
It is not a fanciful belief that upon such an occasion, the Civil War president drank of the cooling waters which spring from among its roots.
Poem on a plaque near the Lincoln Oak image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 15, 2012
5. Poem on a plaque near the Lincoln Oak
May your love be as strong as the heart of this tree.
And as pure as the waters beneath,
May your joys be as deep as its roots may be
And your sorrow as light as its leaf.
-- Thomas Hendricks --
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 30, 2008, by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,822 times since then and 48 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 30, 2008, by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland.   5. submitted on November 23, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.
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