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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Savannah in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Capt. Denis N. Cottineau (1745-1808)

 
 
Capt. Denis N. Cottineau (1745-1808) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 2008
1. Capt. Denis N. Cottineau (1745-1808) Marker
Inscription. This grave links Savannah with one of history's greatest naval dramas - the epic fight in 1779 between the "Bon Homme Richard" and "Serapis" in which John Paul Jones immortalized himself. Denis Nicolas Cottineau de Kerloguen received a commission in the Continental Navy during the American Revolution. Commanding the slow sailing “Pallas” during the famous naval engagement of September 23, 1779, Capt. Cottineau, by skillful seamanship, forced H.M.S. “Countess of Scarborough” to strike her colors. He was subsequently wounded in a duel with another officer, Pierre Landais, against whom Commodore Jones made serious charges after the battle.

Cottineau later settled in the French West Indies. During the slave insurrection in San Domingo he fled to Pennsylvania where he joined several fellow French refugees in establishing a colony. Suffering from a “lingering illness,” he came to Savannah early in 1808. Capt. Cottineau died here, Nov. 29 of that year, at the residence of Abbe Carles. Cottineau’s widow was the sister of the Marquis de Montalet who once owned the Hermitage plantation near Savannah.

In 1928 Ambassador Paul Claudel of France knelt in homage here at the grave of the gallant Frenchman who helped establish the prestige of the infant American Navy.
 
Erected
Capt. Denis N. Cottineau (1745-1808) Marker,seen along Abercorn St. in Savannah image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 23, 2008
2. Capt. Denis N. Cottineau (1745-1808) Marker,seen along Abercorn St. in Savannah
1957 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 025-55.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 32° 4.506′ N, 81° 5.455′ W. Marker is in Savannah, Georgia, in Chatham County. Marker is on Abercorn Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Located along the west fence within the Colonial Park Cemetery. Marker is in this post office area: Savannah GA 31401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Captain Denis Cottineau De Kerloguen ( here, next to this marker); Col. James S. McIntosh (1784-1847) ( within shouting distance of this marker); General Lachlan McIntosh (1727-1806) ( within shouting distance of this marker); Edward Greene Malbone (1777-1807) ( within shouting distance of this marker); Joseph Clay, Patriot ( within shouting distance of this marker); Joseph Vallence Bevan (1798-1830) ( within shouting distance of this marker); James Johnston ( within shouting distance of this marker); Colonial Park ( about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Savannah.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. Marker for Colonial Park
 
Also see . . .
Capt. Denis N. Cottineau (1745-1808) Marker, in Colonial Park Cemetery, Savannah image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
3. Capt. Denis N. Cottineau (1745-1808) Marker, in Colonial Park Cemetery, Savannah

1. American Geographers, 1784-1812:. He commanded the " Pallas " (Submitted on February 12, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. John Paul Jones By Dennis M. Conrad. "Jones' quest for fame also led him to diminish unfairly the contributions made by fellow officers during the engagement with Serapis. One of the captains in Jones' squadron, Denis-Nicholas Cottineau, whom Jones considered a friend, wrote a memoir that was highly critical of Jones when he became irritated with his insufferable self-promotion. As Cottineau wrote on 15 November 1779: "Ungrateful to his crew, he makes it seem that he alone did everything." Nor was this a new development. Throughout his service in the Continental Navy, Jones was slow to credit subordinates or superiors and quick to criticize them. As a result, he comes across as ungrateful, super-sensitive, and self-absorbed." (Submitted on February 12, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

3. A History of the United States Navy, from 1775 to 1898. The "Pellas" (Submitted on February 12, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

4. Battle of Flamborough Head. (actions during the engagement with Serapis.) Jones immediately wrote a report to his own government master, Benjamin Franklin, one notable feature of which was, inevitably, the conduct of Captain Landais( of the "Alliance", Continental Navy ). Furious though he was, he wrote "I forbear to take any steps With him until I have the advice and approbation of your
Plaque Memorial Next to Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
4. Plaque Memorial Next to Marker
Captain Denis Cottineau De Kerloguen In Honor and Grateful Memory of Captain Denis Cottineau De Kerloguen who was born in Nantes, France and died in Savannah Ga.,November 20, 1808, aged 63 Years. In the war for American Independence he fought with John Paul Jones in the famous battle between the Bon Homme Richard and the Serapis, on September 23, 1779, in which he commanded the Pallas, a ship of war of the United States, and rendered noble service to the American cause. For his part in this engagement he was praised by Capt. Jones and by Benjamin Franklin, and was decorated with the Cross of St. Louis by the French Government. He was amember of The Society Of The Cincinnati in the state of Georgia.
Erected on the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of the Bon Homme Richard and the Serapis By the City of Savannah and Patriotic Societies.
Excellency". Captain Cottineau, on the other hand, placed himself under no such obligation, and called Landais a coward to his face. As a result, he was challenged to a duel, in which Landais once again demonstrated his superior military skill by running his sword through Cottineau’s chest, just missing the heart. (Submitted on February 12, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraNotable PersonsWar, US Revolutionary
 
At The Main Gate to Colonial Park Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 2008
5. At The Main Gate to Colonial Park Cemetery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 12, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,548 times since then and 62 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on February 12, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2, 3, 4. submitted on November 30, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   5. submitted on February 12, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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