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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Taft in Kern County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

History of Taft

 
 
History of Taft Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 6, 2012
1. History of Taft Marker
Inscription. As Taftís first 100 years is being celebrated in 2010, letís look back to see from where we came. Taft got its start when the railroad laid tracks to Taft and beyond. Siding Number Two was where it all started along the tracks in the vicinity of 2nd and Supply Row. Railroad cars were being unloaded with supplies for the rapidly expanding oil production for miles along what was called the Midway Sunset Oil Field. Buildings began springing up, followed by houses, businesses, schools, and everything needed for a progressive city to start itself. Electricity and a water supply were brought in. The voters approved incorporation and Taft became a city on November 7, 1910. The railroad began subdividing, installing streets, sidewalks, gutters, and curbs. The City of Taft was taking shape. The downtown area was flooded with workers at all hours of the day, working 12-hours shifts. It is said Taft resembled a mining town that never slept. Those were the good times and the good times have never stopped.
 
Erected 2010 by Pete Gianopulos.
 
Location. 35° 8.371′ N, 119° 27.659′ W. Marker is in Taft, California, in Kern County. Marker can be reached from Supply Row near East 6th Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map
History of Taft Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 6, 2012
2. History of Taft Marker
. The marker is located at the Oilworkers Memorial which is located at the corner of Supply Row and East 6th Street. Marker is at or near this postal address: 570 Supply Row, Taft CA 93268, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 7 other markers are within 15 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Midway Cemetery - 25 Hill (approx. 0.7 miles away); The Fort, Taft (approx. 0.8 miles away); a different marker also named The Fort (approx. 0.8 miles away); West Kern Oil Museum (approx. 0.8 miles away); Lakeview Gusher No.1 (approx. 4.7 miles away); Maricopa's Jail (approx. 6.3 miles away); McKittrick Brea Pit (approx. 14.3 miles away).
 
Categories. Natural ResourcesNotable Events
 
Taft Oil Worker Monument - wide view image. Click for full size.
May 22, 2011
3. Taft Oil Worker Monument - wide view
The marker is visible here in the foreground, mounted to a low concrete base.
The Oilworker Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 6, 2012
4. The Oilworker Marker
When the news spread that oil had been discovered in the San Joaquin Valley of California, young men responded from all parts of our nation. The came from the farms of Missouri and Kansas, the ranches of Texas, the hills of West Virginia, and the mines of Pennsylvania. They were strong and rugged men, unskilled in their new jobs, but from these men came new ideas and innovation. They toiled in dangerous and dirty conditions with temperatures sometimes reaching over 120 degrees in the summer. There were no hard hats or other safety equipment that we use today. From these oil fields men took the ideas and technology around the world. Victor Killingsworth
Oilworker Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 6, 2012
5. Oilworker Memorial
1910 Cable Tool Rig Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 6, 2012
6. 1910 Cable Tool Rig Marker
The Oilworker Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 6, 2012
7. The Oilworker Marker
Benjamin Victor, Scuptor Celecbrating the City of Taft's 100 Year Anniversary and 100 Year of oil production starting with the cable tool rig.
Oilworker Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 6, 2012
8. Oilworker Memorial
Oilworker Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 6, 2012
9. Oilworker Memorial
Close-up of female statue. image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 6, 2012
10. Close-up of female statue.
Close-up of oil worker. image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 6, 2012
11. Close-up of oil worker.
Closeup of oilworker. image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 6, 2012
12. Closeup of oilworker.
Closeup of child statue with his Mom. image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 6, 2012
13. Closeup of child statue with his Mom.
Oilworker Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 6, 2012
14. Oilworker Memorial
Oilworker Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 6, 2012
15. Oilworker Memorial
Closeup of oilworker image. Click for full size.
May 22, 2011
16. Closeup of oilworker
Oilworker Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 6, 2012
17. Oilworker Memorial
Contributors image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 6, 2012
18. Contributors
Just one of many walls of many contributors.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 13, 2012, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. This page has been viewed 775 times since then and 56 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 13, 2012, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California.   3. submitted on April 16, 2012.   4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on April 13, 2012, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California.   10, 11, 12, 13. submitted on April 27, 2012, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California.   14, 15. submitted on April 13, 2012, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California.   16. submitted on April 16, 2012.   17, 18. submitted on April 13, 2012, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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