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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Maumee in Lucas County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Battle of Fallen Timbers

 
 
Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 20, 2011
1. Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker
Close-up view of the text on the front side of the historic marker.
Inscription. [Front Side Text of Marker] : "Battle of Fallen Timbers"

The Battle of Fallen Timbers, fought on August 20, 1794, is one of the most significant events relating to post-Revolutionary War America. Major General "Mad" Anthony Wayne led the Federal Army, known as The Legion of the United States against a confederacy of Native Americans led by Miami Chief Little Turtle and Shawnee war chief Blue Jacket. Defeat in battle and lack of help from their nearby British allies disheartened the tribes and lead to the 1795 Treaty of Greenville. The Treaty secured United States control of the Northwest Territory and ultimately resulted in the formation of five new states-Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, and Wisconsin. (continued on other side)

[Back Side Text of Marker] : "Battle of Fallen Timbers"

(continued from other side) The Battle of Fallen Timbers began with an ambush of mounted Kentucky militia by a large confederated force of Native Americans. The Native defenders pursued the fleeing militia into an area of tornado-damaged forest where the Legion met them with a skirmish line. For an hour, the opponents waged a fierce battle in the fallen timbers. During this stage of the battle, the majority of the Legion formed a battle line and in a bayonet charge used their superior numbers
Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 20, 2011
2. Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker
Close-up view of the text on the back side of the historic marker.
to drive the confederacy from the battlefield. The battle, which covered an area of two to four square miles, lasted for approximately two hours and involved about 3,000 individuals. In 1995 archaeologists determined the actual site of the battle at this location.
 
Erected 2003 by Ohio Bicentennial Commission, The Longaberger Company, Metroparks of The Toledo Area, and The Ohio Historical Society . (Marker Number 46-48.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 41° 32.978′ N, 83° 41.925′ W. Marker is in Maumee, Ohio, in Lucas County. Marker is on North Jerome Road south of Monclova Road, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. For quite some time (I assume since 2003) this marker was housed inside of the Edward and Prudence Lamb Heritage Center (1025 West River Road), over at Side Cut Metro Park, however, with the opening of the new Fallen Timbers Battlefield, Metro Park and Visitor Center, things have changed. Now the marker is situated outdoors, in the Visitor Center parking area. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4949 North Jerome Road , Maumee OH 43537, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker
Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 20, 2011
3. Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker
How the historic marker was displayed in the Lamb Center on the day that I visited.
. Why Fight Here? ( about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Partners in Preservation ( about 500 feet away); Unfair Negotiations ( about 600 feet away); Early American Defeats ( about 700 feet away); Fighting Forces ( about 800 feet away); A Long March ( approx. 0.2 miles away); Cover and Camouflage ( approx. mile away); Caught Off Guard ( approx. mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Maumee.
 
More about this marker. This marker was moved from the Edward and Prudence Lamb Heritage Center, over at Side Cut Metro Park, to the Fallen Timbers Battlefield Park, when the new park opened in October of 2015.
 
Also see . . .  Battle of Fallen Timbers. This is a link to information provided by the Ohio Historical Society at their Remarkable Ohio web site. (Submitted on April 22, 2012, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansWars, US Indian
 
Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 20, 2011
4. Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker
View of the front door to the Lamb Center where the historic marker was originally displayed.
Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 20, 2011
5. Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker
View of the outdoor patio and steps that lead to the Lamb Center where the historic marker was once located.
Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 20, 2011
6. Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker
Distant view of Lamb Center where historic marker was once located.
Battle of Fallen Timbers image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, April 20, 2011
7. Battle of Fallen Timbers
View of painting of the Battle of Fallen Timbers that is on display at the Fort Meigs museum, just across the Maumee River from the site of both the historic marker and the battlefield.
Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, November 5, 2015
8. Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker
View of the front side of the marker, situated in its new location, in the parking area of the new Fallen Timbers Battlefield, Visitor Center.
Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, November 5, 2015
9. Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker
View of the marker (seen in the extreme right of the picture) situated in the parking area of the park's visitor center (seen in the left/center of the picture).
Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, November 5, 2015
10. Battle of Fallen Timbers Marker
View of the Metro Park/Federal Park sign, for the Fallen Timbers Battlefield Visitor Center, situated along the east side of Jerome Road.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 6, 2017. This page originally submitted on April 15, 2012, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 1,011 times since then and 87 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on April 24, 2012, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   8, 9, 10. submitted on November 5, 2015, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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