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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Hamptonville in Yadkin County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Windsor's Crossroads

Stoneman's Raiders Pass By

 

—Stoneman's Raid —

 
Windsor's Crossroads Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, May 2, 2012
1. Windsor's Crossroads Marker
Inscription. (Preface):
On March 24, 1865, Union Gen. George Stoneman led 6,000 cavalrymen from Tennessee into southwestern Virginia and western North Carolina to disrupt the Confederate supply line by destroying sections of the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, the North Carolina Railroad, and the Piedmont Railroad. He struck at Boone on March 28, headed into Virginia on April 2, and returned to North Carolina a week later. Stoneman's Raid ended at Asheville on April 26, the day that Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston surrendered to Union Gen. William T. Sherman near Durham.
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Early in April, a detachment of Union Gen. George Stoneman's cavalry rode south from Jonesville to Hamptonville and passed through Windsor's Crossroads here. Alfred "Teen" Blackburn, then a slave, later recalled that the Union cavalrymen rode "three abreast" on the "narrow dirt road that runs a few feet in front of my house." He reported that the Federals burned "everything along the way," including the Buck Shoals Mill, located about two miles north of here. Local resident, Colvin J. Cowles wrote to his son on April 6 that Stoneman's men, after burning the mill, continued into Iredell County to burn the Eagle Mill. En route, they passed through Windsor's Crossroads.

More than twenty Confederate veterans are buried in the Flat Rock Baptist
Windsor's Crossroads Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, May 2, 2012
2. Windsor's Crossroads Marker
Church cemetery, about four miles northeast of here. The church was founded in 1783 as Petty's Meetinghouse. Among those buried there are Yadkin County natives Capt. James West, killed in 1863 in the skirmish at Bond Schoolhouse, and Robert Duvall (1819-1863), who served as a lieutenant in in the U.S. Navy until 1859, and then as captain of a small Confederate steamer, the Beaufort. Duvall and Beaufort engaged USS Albatross on July 21, 1861, off the North Carolina coast near Cape Hatteras. Duvall claimed victory in this, among the earliest all-naval battles of the Civil War.

Major funding for this project was provided by the North Carolina Department of Transportation Enhancement Program of the Federal transportation Efficiency Act for the 21st Century
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(Sidebar 1):
John A. Hampton, the grandson on Hamptonville founder Henry Hampton, began practicing law in Wilkesboro in 1858. When war came, he volunteered in the Wilkes Valley Guards, which became part of the 1st Regiment North Carolina Infantry. He resigned because of bad health in September 1863, but later served as an officer in Yadkin County's 74th Regiment North Carolina Militia. He is buried in Flat Rock Church cemetery.
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(Sidebar 2):
In January 1862, 18-year-old Alfred "Teen" Blackburn accompanied his [so-called] master, Pvt. John Augustus
Col. John A. Hampton's tombstone (Courtesy Greg Cheek) image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, May 2, 2012
3. Col. John A. Hampton's tombstone (Courtesy Greg Cheek)
[Inset1]
Blackburn, to Camp Mangum, a Confederate mustering ground. Pvt. Blackburn served in Co. F, 21st North Carolina Infantry, and Alfred Blackburn was his bodyguard, cook, and all-round helper (for which he later received a pension of $26.26 per month). His brother Wiley Blackburn was a body servant in Company B, 38th North Carolina Infantry. After the war, Alfred Blackburn worked as a mail carrier for sixty years, first on the route from Hamptonville to Jonesville and then from Hamptonville to Statesville. He died in 1951, believed to be the last surviving participant in the war in the state. He is buried at nearby Pleasant Hill Baptist Church in Iredell County.
 
Erected by North Carolina Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the North Carolina Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 36° 4.162′ N, 80° 49.937′ W. Marker is near Hamptonville, North Carolina, in Yadkin County. Marker is at the intersection of Windsor Road and Buck Shoals Road, on the right on Windsor Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Hamptonville NC 27020, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Flat Rock Baptist Church (approx. 3.8 miles away); Harmony Hill Camp Meeting
Alfred "Teen" Blackburn (Courtesy Studio One) image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, May 2, 2012
4. Alfred "Teen" Blackburn (Courtesy Studio One)
[Inset2]
(approx. 8.2 miles away); Thomas L. Clingman (approx. 10.7 miles away); Yadkinville (approx. 10.8 miles away); Second Yadkin County Jail (approx. 10.9 miles away); Jonesville (approx. 11.8 miles away); North Wilkesboro Speedway (approx. 11.9 miles away); Benjamin Cleveland (approx. 12.1 miles away).
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Flat Rock Baptist Church and Bond Schoolhouse
 
Categories. African AmericansCemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
 
Windsor's Crossroads Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, May 2, 2012
5. Windsor's Crossroads Marker
Windsor's Crossroads Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, May 2, 2012
6. Windsor's Crossroads Marker
Windsor's Crossroads Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox
7. Windsor's Crossroads Marker
Grave Stone for Colonel John A. Hampton image. Click for full size.
By Forest McDermott, October 28, 2013
8. Grave Stone for Colonel John A. Hampton
Photo of the grave stone is on the marker, but I came across the grave at the Flat Rock Baptist Church.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 13, 2012, by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. This page has been viewed 649 times since then and 76 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on May 13, 2012, by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina.   8. submitted on July 19, 2014, by Forest McDermott of Masontown, Pennsylvania. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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