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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Middletown in Frederick County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

End Of Sheridan’s Ride

 
 
End Of Sheridan's Ride Marker image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, June 3, 2006
1. End Of Sheridan's Ride Marker
Inscription. This knoll marks the position of the Union Army when Sheridan rejoined it at 10:30 A.M., October 19, 1864, in the Battle of Cedar Creek. His arrival, with Wright's efforts, checked the Union retreat.
 
Erected 1927 by Conservation & Development Commission. (Marker Number A-14.)
 
Location. 39° 2.79′ N, 78° 15.536′ W. Marker is in Middletown, Virginia, in Frederick County. Marker is at the intersection of Valley Pike (U.S. 11) and Rienzi Knoll Lane, on the right when traveling south on Valley Pike. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Middletown VA 22645, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Battle of Cedar Creek ( approx. 0.8 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Cedar Creek ( approx. 0.9 miles away); Middletown ( approx. 1.2 miles away); Engagement Of Middletown ( approx. 1.5 miles away); Colonel Charles Russell Lowell ( approx. 1.5 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Middletown.
 
Regarding End Of Sheridan’s Ride. The Cedar Creek battlefield is interpreted by several markers. See the Battle of Cedar Creek Virtual Tour by Markers link below.
 
Also see . . .
End Of Sheridan’s Ride Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2007
2. End Of Sheridan’s Ride Marker

1. The Poem, “Sheridan’s Ride”. by Thomas Buchanan Read. (Submitted on October 3, 2006.) 

2. The Truth About Sheridan’s Ride. (Submitted on October 3, 2006.)
3. Start of Sheridan's Ride. The start point of the much romanticized ride was in Winchester. (Submitted on October 19, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

4. Cedar Creek CMH Staff Ride. The location where Sheridan rallied the Union troops is stop 11 of the Center of Military History staff ride of the Cedar Creek Battlefield. (Submitted on November 5, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

5. Battle of Cedar Creek Virtual Tour by Markers. The related markers here follow a tour of the Cedar Creek Battlefield, October 19, 1864. (Submitted on December 8, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

6. Battle of Cedar Creek Preservation Efforts. Civil War Preservation Trust site detailing preservation efforts at the battlefield. The site includes a wealth of background information on the battle and an animated map. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Additional keywords. General Philip H. Sheridan
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Union Army Rallies image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2007
3. Union Army Rallies
Along Klines Mill Road (Route 633) the Federals rallied as Sheridan arrived on the battlefield. The ground in this section of the battlefield is somewhat as it was in 1864, with pastures and orchards.
Sheridan's Ride - Battle of Cedar Creek image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
4. Sheridan's Ride - Battle of Cedar Creek
Alfred R. Waud's 1864 drawing of Sheridan's arrival at Cedar Creek.
Rienzi Knoll Lane and The Valley Pike image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 13, 2014
5. Rienzi Knoll Lane and The Valley Pike
Rienzi was the famous horse Sheridan rode along the Valley Pike from Winchester to Cedar Creek.
Rienzi image. Click for full size.
By Smithsonian Museum of American History
6. Rienzi
Responding to the extraordinary popularity of Thomas Buchanan Read's poem "Sheridan's Ride", General Sheridan gave his horse Rienzi a new name: Winchester. When Rienzi / Winchester died in 1871, he was stuffed and placed in the Military Service Institution at Governor's Island. In 1922 he was moved to the Smithsonian Museum of American History.

With foam and with dust the black charger was grey;
By the flash of his eye and red nostril's play
He seemed to the whole great Army to say;
"I have brought you, Sheridan, all the way
From Winchester down to save the day!"
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 3, 2006, by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota. This page has been viewed 1,820 times since then and 56 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on October 3, 2006, by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota.   2, 3. submitted on October 19, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5, 6. submitted on October 18, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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