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Sutton in Braxton County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The War and Suttonville

Changing Occupations

 

—Jones-Imboden Raid —

 
The War and Suttonville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 2, 2012
1. The War and Suttonville Marker
Inscription. (Preface): On April 20, 1863, Confederate Gens. William E. “Grumble” Jones and John D. Imboden began a raid from Virginia through present-day West Virginia against the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. Taking separate routes, they later reported that they marched 1,100 miles, fought several engagements, captured 100 Federals, seized about 1,200 horses and 4,000 cattle, and burned 4 turnpike bridges, more than 20 railroad bridges, 2 trains, and 150,000 barrels of oil. Most bridges were soon repaired. Confederate losses were slight. By May 26, both commands had returned to Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley.

Confederate Gen. John D. Imboden and his cavalry men left Gen. William E. Jones at Buckhannon on May 6, 1863, and marched toward Summerville, where the two forces would reunite a week later. On May 12, Imboden, with Col. William L. “Mudwall” Jackson and his second-in-command struck here at Suttonville. Because of bad weather and muddy roads, Imboden’s progress had been slow. “No incident of interest occurred on the march,” he later reported, “until we reached Big Birch River, in Braxton, on the evening of the 12th. At Bulltown, Suttonville, and Big Birch the enemy had block-houses and intrenchments, and had destroyed at each place large amounts of stores laid in for the summer’s
The War and Suttonville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 2, 2012
2. The War and Suttonville Marker
campaign. I destroyed their quarters and block-houses at these several places.”

The small Federal garrison had just evacuated the town. Imboden and his men rode on to Summersville the next day. Union troops soon reoccupied Suttonville.

"Phoebe Hefner ... came [to Suttonville] to get a doctor for her sister, Elizabeth, who was very ill with typhoid fever, ... but the post commander ... refused to allow the girl to return ... [until] the next day [when she found] her sister was dead. She was so incensed that she planned revenge and ... went to [Confederate Col. William L.] Jackson's camp and asked that a force of soldiers be sent to capture Sutton[ville]. During the night that she was held ... she had heard the roll call of soldiers, observed their strength and position and this information made the capture easy."
- Local tradition regarding Imboden's raid, Charleston Daily Mail, March 27, 1938

(Sidebar): The Weston and Gauley Bridge Turnpike was one of the better roads in a section of the state with difficult terrain and few roads of any kind. It was macadamized (hard-surfaced) in parts, and farmers used it to transport grain and timber to the gristmills and sawmills in Suttonville. During the war, both Union and Confederate forces considered the turnpike to be of strategic importance for moving men and supplies north and south.
The War and Suttonville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 2, 2012
3. The War and Suttonville Marker
Suttonville's location on the turnpike guaranteed that the contending forces would occupy or march through the community several times. In the summer of 1861, Union Gen. William S. Rosecrans and his 10,000-man army camped here, the largest force that ever bivouacked in Suttonville or marched through central West Virginia. They left on September 7, 1861. Three days later the fought the Battle of Carnifex Ferry.
 
Erected by West Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the West Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 39.87′ N, 80° 42.522′ W. Marker is in Sutton, West Virginia, in Braxton County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street and 3rd Street, on the right when traveling west on Main Street. Touch for map. On the grounds of the Braxton County Courthouse. Marker is at or near this postal address: 300 Main Street, Sutton WV 26601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 6 other markers are within 15 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Burning of Suttonville (approx. 0.4 miles away); America's Guard of Honor (approx. 10.8 miles away); Bulltown / Bulltown Battle (approx. 11.4 miles away); Battle of Bulltown
The War and Suttonville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 2, 2012
4. The War and Suttonville Marker
(approx. 11.9 miles away); Town of Burnsville (approx. 13.7 miles away); Young's Monument (approx. 14.5 miles away).
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
The War and Suttonville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 2, 2012
5. The War and Suttonville Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 24, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 499 times since then and 41 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 24, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   5. submitted on September 10, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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