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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Manassas in Prince William County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Brigadier General Francis Stebbings Bartow

 
 
Brigadier General Francis Stebbings Bartow Marker (Readable) image. Click for full size.
circa December 29, 2009
1. Brigadier General Francis Stebbings Bartow Marker (Readable)
Inscription.
Born Savannah Georgia, Sept. 16, 1816
Mortally wounded on this spot,
July 21, 1861
Commanded 7th, 8th, 9th & 11th Georgia &
1st Kentucky Regiments
The first Confederate officer
to give his life on the field.

 
Erected 1936 by the Georgia Division, United Daughters of the Confederacy and the WPA—Works Progress Administration.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the United Daughters of the Confederacy, and the Works Progress Administration (WPA) projects marker series.
 
Location. 38° 48.863′ N, 77° 31.243′ W. Marker is near Manassas, Virginia, in Prince William County. Marker can be reached from Sudley Road (Virginia Route 234) 0.6 miles south of Lee Highway (U.S. 29), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. The monument on the Henry House Hill trail, which starts at the Manassas National Battlefield Park visitor center. Marker is in this post office area: Manassas VA 20109, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Bartow Monument (here, next to this marker); Thomas Jonathan Jackson (within shouting distance of this marker); General Barnard Elliott Bee
Brigadier General Francis Stebbings Bartow Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 4, 2008
2. Brigadier General Francis Stebbings Bartow Monument
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Henry Hill (about 400 feet away); Washington (Louisiana) Artillery Battalion (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Manassas.
 
Also see . . .
1. Francis S. Bartow. Encouraging his men, Bartow announced, "General Beauregard expects us to hold this position and Georgians, I expect you to hold it." Shortly afterward he was hit by a bullet. His last words to the men were "They have killed me, but, boys, never give up." (Submitted on June 8, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Memorial to General Bartow in Savannah. (Submitted on June 17, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Brigadier General Francis Stebbings Bartow Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, June 10, 2006
3. Brigadier General Francis Stebbings Bartow Marker
Brigadier General Francis Stebbings Bartow Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 1985
4. Brigadier General Francis Stebbings Bartow Marker
Brigadier General Francis Stebbings Bartow Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 10, 2006
5. Brigadier General Francis Stebbings Bartow Marker
The "original" monument was placed where the cluster of trees now stand next to the current monument.
The Original Bartow Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 19, 2008
6. The Original Bartow Monument
In September 1861, just months after the battle, a monument was erected and dedicated on the field, just paces away from the present day monument. The original monument was, according to a contemporary sketch, inscribed "Francis S. Bartow - They have killed me Boys, but don't give up the fight!" During the war, the monument was vandalized and deteriorated. Attempts to restore the monument were unsuccessful. All that remains, unfortunately, is this "stone" inside the cluster of trees next to the present day monument. (Thanks to Jim Burgess, Museum Specialist, Manassas National Battlefield Park, for providing the background on this early monument.)
Brigadier General Francis Stebbings Bartow Grave, Savannah Georgia image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, August 31, 2008
7. Brigadier General Francis Stebbings Bartow Grave, Savannah Georgia
Colonel 8th Regt.
Georgia Volunteers
Confederate States Army
Born Savannah
September 6th 1815
Fell at Manassas,
July 21st 1861.
Erected by the Confederate Associates
Oglethorpe Light Infantry
and Citizens of Savannah
June 3, 1902

 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 21, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 8, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,908 times since then and 66 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on April 6, 2010.   2. submitted on June 8, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on October 8, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.   4. submitted on November 23, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   5. submitted on October 8, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   6. submitted on July 28, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   7. submitted on November 23, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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