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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Independence in Montgomery County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Drum Creek and the Civil War

 
 
Drum Creek and the Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jamie Cox, October 12, 2012
1. Drum Creek and the Civil War Marker
Updated marker as of October 2012.
Inscription.
During the Civil War, militias from both the Union and Confederate sides were stealing the Osages' cattle, harassing their villages, and blaming the Indians for raids actually committed by Americans. Osage leader Charles Mongrain cautioned everyone to leave his people alone: "I most earnestly warn all intruders, trespassers, and others not citizens of the Osage nation to leave the nation immediately."

In May 1863, a few miles east of here, an Osage hunting party confronted about 20 strangers riding through their territory. A shot was fired, and one of the Osage went down. His comrades chased the trespassers about 15 miles and finally overtook them near Drum Creek, killing all but two (who escaped). The strangers turned out to have been Confederate officers, marching west with orders to recruit volunteers and encourage rebellion in New Mexico & Colorado. The Osage has foiled the plot.

Text of Previous Edition of the Marker
In May, 1863, a mounted party of about twenty Confederates, nearly all commissioned officers, set out from Missouri to recruit troops in the West. Several miles east of here they were challenged by loyal Osage Indians. In a running fight two Confederates were killed and the others were surrounded on a gravel bar in the Verdigris river about three miles north of this marker. Ignoring
Civil War Battle [and] Drum Creek Treaty Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 18, 2011
2. Civil War Battle [and] Drum Creek Treaty Marker
Replaced in 2012 with new state marker
a flag of surrender, the Osages scalped and cut the heads off all but two of the party. These, wounded, hid under the river bank and escaped.

After the war when settlers began staking claims on the Osage reservation, Congress authorized removal of the tribe to present Oklahoma. In 1870 a treaty was signed in a grove on Drum creek, three miles southeast. Ironically, the cheap lands to which the Osages were removed became a great oil field and for a time they were the wealthiest people per capita in the world.
 
Erected 2012 by State of Kansas. (Marker Number 56.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Kansas Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 37° 13.495′ N, 95° 40.35′ W. Marker is near Independence, Kansas, in Montgomery County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street (U.S. 160) and 4410th Street, on the left when traveling east on Main Street. Touch for map. There are official signs on US 160 pointing out the location of the marker, which is slightly off the main road. Marker is in this post office area: Independence KS 67301, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Dewlen - Spohnhauer Memorial Bridge (approx. 0.3 miles away); Stoddard - Thompson Memorial Bell
Civil War Battle [and] Drum Creek Treaty Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 18, 2011
3. Civil War Battle [and] Drum Creek Treaty Marker
Looking southeast toward the road intersection
(approx. 1.8 miles away); F-100F Super Sabre (approx. 1.8 miles away); United Spanish War Veterans Memorial (approx. 1.9 miles away); Replica of the Statue of Liberty (approx. 1.9 miles away); Kayo's Boys (approx. 2 miles away); A. C. Stich Memorial (approx. 2 miles away); Veterans Memorial (approx. 2.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Independence.
 
Also see . . .
1. About the Osage Nation. (Submitted on February 24, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Leaving the Banks of Drum Creek. (Submitted on February 24, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNative AmericansSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 24, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 876 times since then and 108 times this year. Last updated on October 22, 2012, by Jamie Cox of Melbourne, Florida. Photos:   1. submitted on October 22, 2012, by Jamie Cox of Melbourne, Florida.   2, 3. submitted on February 24, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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