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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Memphis in Shelby County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Mary Church Terrell

1863 - 1954

 
 
Mary Church Terrell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Judith Barber, February 5, 2013
1. Mary Church Terrell Marker
Inscription. Born in Memphis in 1863, Mary Church Terrell was noted as a champion of human rights. The daughter of millionaire Robert Church, Sr., she was graduated from Oberlin College in 1884 and later made her home in Washington, D.C. In 1904, she was a delegate to the International Council of Women in Berlin, where she was the only woman to address the group in French, German and English. A 1909 charter member of the N.A.A.C.P., she was an active worker for women’s suffrage and the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, in the 1950s she lead marches to desegregate restaurants in Washington, D.C. She authored A Colored Woman in a White World.
 
Erected by Tennessee Historical Commission. (Marker Number 4E 123.)
 
Location. 35° 8.341′ N, 90° 2.851′ W. Marker is in Memphis, Tennessee, in Shelby County. Marker is on Beale Street east of South 4th Street, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Located in Robert Church Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 414 Beale St., Memphis TN 38103, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Phi Beta Sigma/Abram Langston Taylor (a few steps from this marker); Church Park (a few steps from this marker); Sara Roberta Church
Mary Church Terrell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Judith Barber, February 5, 2013
2. Mary Church Terrell Marker
(a few steps from this marker); Church Park Auditorium (within shouting distance of this marker); This Plaque is Dedicated to Father and Son, Leaders of Their Race (within shouting distance of this marker); Solvent Savings Bank (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Memphis Home of W.C. Handy (about 400 feet away); It was a Struggle for Freedom For Dignity and For Equality (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Memphis.
 
Also see . . .  Mary Church Terrell. (Submitted on August 15, 2015, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil Rights
 
Mary Church Terrell<br>1863-1854 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2015
3. Mary Church Terrell
1863-1854
This 1946 portrait of Mary Church Terrell by Betsy Graves Reyneau hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC.

“Mary Church Terrell's determination to encourage the development of self-help and social service programs among black women resulted in her founding and presiding over the National Association of Colored Women in 1896. But her life was also dedicated to the achievement of equity for all. Terrell's influence quickly spread across the nation as she eloquently addressed audiences and composed numerous articles, poems, and short stories, which often embodied the themes of race and gender equity. Her autobiography, A Colored Woman in a White World, was published in 1940. In Washington, Terrell served on the D.C. Board of Education for more than ten years and participated in numerous protests to end segregation in restaurants, hotels, and theaters in the city.“ — National Portrait Gallery
Robert Church Park image. Click for full size.
By Judith Barber, February 5, 2013
4. Robert Church Park
Marker is located to the left of the entrance to the park.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 15, 2013, by Judith Barber of Marietta, Georgia. This page has been viewed 355 times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 15, 2013, by Judith Barber of Marietta, Georgia.   3. submitted on August 12, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   4. submitted on February 15, 2013, by Judith Barber of Marietta, Georgia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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