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Baltimore, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Lillie Carroll Jackson Museum

 
 
Lillie Carroll Jackson Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, March 24, 2008
1. Lillie Carroll Jackson Museum Marker
Inscription. "God opened my mouth and no man can shut it." With this firm belief in God and herself, "Ma" Jackson acieved extraordinary success in securing equal rights for blacks in Baltimore and Maryland. Born in 1889, she began fighting for black equality and civil rights in the late 1920's after several personal incidents of discrimination.

President of Baltimore's NAACP chapter from 1935-69, Mrs. Jackson expanded it into the largest chapter in the nation by 1946. Under her leadership, and with the helf of the NAACP's Legal Redress Committee, the chapter desegregated the city's private and public facilities, worked for equal employment opportunities, secured the election of blacks to public office, and removed Jim Crow laws. The organization also equalized teachers' salaries throughout the state and, in a series of cased from 1935-50, opened the University of Maryland to blacks.

Mrs. Jackson believed in the powers of the church, school, and home to shape character. She desired ultimately to join blacks and white in a single, unified community; for, as she said, "You can't have freedom and equality without brotherhood, and you can't have brotherhood without freedom and equality." Lillie May Carroll Jackson died on July 5, 1975.

[photograph]
An NAACP delegation led by Dr. Lillie Carroll Jackson and W.A.C.
Lillie Carroll Jackson Museum image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, March 24, 2008
2. Lillie Carroll Jackson Museum
Hughes in a protest hearing before the liqous board, 1957.
 
Erected by the City of Baltimore, Lillie Carroll Jackson Museum, sponsor and William Donald Schaefer, mayor.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland, Baltimore City historical markers marker series.
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 39° 18.261′ N, 76° 37.619′ W. Marker was in Baltimore, Maryland. Marker was on Eutaw Place, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker was at or near this postal address: 1320 Eutaw Place, Baltimore MD 21217, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. St. James Court (a few steps from this marker); Lillie Carroll Jackson Civil Rights Museum (a few steps from this marker); Early Civil Rights Era (a few steps from this marker); Sidney Lanier (within shouting distance of this marker); Howard A. Kelly, M.D. (within shouting distance of this marker); Daniel Coit Gilman (within shouting distance of this marker); The Md. Prince Hall Masons (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Francis Scott Key (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Baltimore.
 
More about this marker. Marker has been
Lillie Carroll Jackson Museum location image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, March 24, 2008
3. Lillie Carroll Jackson Museum location
replaced by Lillie Carroll Jackson Civil Rights Museum.
 
Categories. 20th CenturyAfrican AmericansCivil Rights
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 1, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 24, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. This page has been viewed 2,689 times since then and 68 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 25, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.
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