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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Manassas in Prince William County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

James Robinson House

 
 
James Robinson House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, June 10, 2006
1. James Robinson House Marker
Inscription. To the south stood the farmhouse of James Robinson, a former slave freed by Landon Carter. There, during the First Battle of Manassas on 21 July 1961, Col. Wade Hamptonís Legion covered the Confederates falling back to Henry Hill, where Jackson stood “like a stone wall.” The house survived that battle, and during the Second Battle of Manassas in August 1862 served the Union troops as a field hospital. Congress later authorized compensation to Robinson for property damages. The present house stands partially on the foundation of the original.
 
Erected 1991 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number G-16.)
 
Location. 38° 49.177′ N, 77° 31.315′ W. Marker is in Manassas, Virginia, in Prince William County. Marker is on Lee Highway (formerly the Warrenton Turnpike) (U.S. 29) north of Sudley Road (Virginia Route 234), on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is just north of the Manassas National Battlefield Parkís Stone House parking lot, on the right as you travel north on US Route 29. Marker is in this post office area: Manassas VA 20109, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Outnumbered: The Stand in Robinson Lane (about 700 feet away, measured
James Robinson House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, June 10, 2006
2. James Robinson House Marker
in a direct line); First Battle of Manassas (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named First Battle of Manassas (approx. 0.2 miles away); Henry House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Robinson House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Stone House (approx. 0.2 miles away); War-Time Henry Hill (approx. 0.2 miles away); Stone House – Battlefield Landmark (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Manassas.
 
More about this marker. This marker stands with three other markers on the side of the road. There is a small gravel pulloff on Lee Highway at these markers. They can also be reached on foot from the Manassas National Battlefield Parkís Stone House parking lot and, at are a pleasant walk from from the parkís Visitors Center on Sudley Road.

Warrenton Turnpike (once U.S. 211), now Lee Highway (once U.S. 29/211), runs east-west through this area. It once had two route numbers, 29 and 211. Route 211 was the east-west route from New Market, Virginia to Washington, D.C. Route 29, a north-south route from Pensacola,
This and the Other Markers as Seen from the Base of Henry Hill image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, June 10, 2006
3. This and the Other Markers as Seen from the Base of Henry Hill
Florida to Baltimore, Maryland, hitched a ride on 211ís pavement from Warrenton to Washington. In the 1981 route 211 was truncated back to Warrenton and this stretch of road became just plain Route 29. So, when you head west into the setting sun on US 29 here you are technically traveling south.
 
Also see . . .  Presenting Race and Slavery at Historic Sites - Manassas National Battlefield Park. There is a photo of the Robinson House foundation on the first page of this Portable Document Format file. (Submitted on October 10, 2006.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansNotable BuildingsWar, US Civil
 
The Foundation of James Robinson's House image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, June 10, 2006
4. The Foundation of James Robinson's House
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 10, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. This page has been viewed 2,064 times since then and 60 times this year. Last updated on March 25, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 10, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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