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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Manassas in Prince William County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Unfinished Railroad

 
 
The Unfinished Railroad Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 10, 2006
1. The Unfinished Railroad Marker
Inscription. Stonewall Jackson set up his defensive line along a two mile section of these cuts and fills, which were originally grading for the Independent Line of the Manassas Gap Railroad. The railroad, begun in the 1850ís, ran out of money after the roadbed had been built from Gainsville, 5 miles to the west, to Alexandria, 25 miles to the east. The coming of the war stopped whatever plans had been made to complete it. No track was ever laid over the grade.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Manassas Gap Railroad marker series.
 
Location. 38° 49.543′ N, 77° 32.926′ W. Marker is in Manassas, Virginia, in Prince William County. Marker is at the intersection of Featherbed Lane and General Trimbles Lane (a private road), on the left when traveling south on Featherbed Lane. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Manassas VA 20109, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Unfinished Railroad (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also
The Unfinished Railroad Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 10, 2006
2. The Unfinished Railroad Marker
Fence blocks the way on the railroad bed heading west.
named The Unfinished Railroad (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Archerís Brigade (about 600 feet away); Second Brigade (about 600 feet away); 63rd Pennsylvania Infantry (approx. ľ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Manassas.
 
More about this marker. The marker was relocated to the National Park Service's parking area on the other side of the road in 2008.
 
Also see . . .
1. Why Save More [Park] Lands?. “A solid stand of pine trees had grown up near the embankment of the unfinished railroad and obscured the clear view that had existed during Second Manassas.” (Submitted on November 3, 2006.) 

2. The Unfinished Railroad, where it intersects the Groveton-Sudley Road. 1903 and 1999 photographs of this intersection. Compare with Photo No. 3. (The Groveton-Sudley Road is now Featherbed Lane.) (Submitted on November 3, 2006.) 

3. The unfinished railroad cutting, 2nd Manassas
The Unfinished Railroad Marker In the Distance image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 10, 2006
3. The Unfinished Railroad Marker In the Distance
Marker can be seen in front of the stairway leading up to a walking path. Fetherbed Lane, a gravel road, runs diagonally across the photograph from bottom to left, north to south. General Trimbles Lane starts on the right.
. Photograph of the railroad bed. (Submitted on November 3, 2006.) 
 
Categories. Railroads & StreetcarsWar, US Civil
 
New Location image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 15, 2009
4. New Location
Note the park gate on the left.
The Unfinished Railroad image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 15, 2009
5. The Unfinished Railroad
Looking at the location where the marker stood until recently. The "cut" beyond the fence is the railroad bed that was under construction when the war broke out. The railroad grade traverses the entire northern half of Manassas Battlefield.
Park Orientation Kiosk image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 15, 2009
6. Park Orientation Kiosk
Next to the marker is one of the Manassas Battlefield orientation kiosks, showing a map of the battlefield and explaining some of the park regulations.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 3, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,946 times since then and 56 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 3, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   4, 5, 6. submitted on April 27, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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