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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Port Gibson in Claiborne County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

Windsor Ruins

 
 
Windsor Ruins Marker image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly, April 6, 2013
1. Windsor Ruins Marker
Inscription. Smith Coffee Daniell II, a successful cotton planter, completed construction of Windsor in 1861. Daniell owned 21,000 acres of plantation land in Louisiana and Mississippi. Ironically, he died in April 1861, only weeks after completing his mansion. His wife and children continued to live at Windsor but were left to suffer the loss of much of the family's holdings during the Civil War.

Windsor's basic style was Greek Revival but with added details borrowed from Italianate and Gothic architecture. The house contained 23 rooms, with an above-ground basement, two residential floors, and an attic. The ell-shaped extension on the east side, attached to a single row of columns extending from the main square, contained the kitchen, pantry, and dining room. Rainwater stored in large tanks in the attic supplied two bathrooms. A cupola, from which the Mississippi River could be viewed, was centered on top of the roof.

The mansion survived the Civil War only to be destroyed by accidental fire on February 17, 1890. All was lost except for the columns and the ironwork. One flight of metal stairs from Windsor is now installed at Oakland Chapel on the campus of nearby Alcorn State University. All of the Daniell family's photographs and drawings of the mansion were lost in the fire. In 1991, historians discovered a drawing of Windsor
Windsor Ruins Marker image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly
2. Windsor Ruins Marker
A reproduction of a soldier's sketch of Windsor which he drew while here in 1863
sketched in 1863 by a Union soldier in Major General Ulysses S. Grant's army. The soldier's drawing is similar to the illustration reproduced here.

Descendants of the Daniell family donated Windsor Ruins to the State of Mississippi in 1974. Today the site is administered by the Mississippi Department of Archives and History.
 
Location. 31° 56.447′ N, 91° 7.776′ W. Marker is near Port Gibson, Mississippi, in Claiborne County. Marker can be reached from Rodney Road (State Highway 552) 1.3 miles north of Rodney Westside Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is about 8.35 miles west of the town of Port Gibson (as the crow flies). Look for the sign that says "Ruins of Windsor State Historic Site." Turn here and follow the unpaved road to the site of Windsor Ruins. Marker is in this post office area: Port Gibson MS 39150, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 6 other markers are within 15 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Bayou Pierre Presbyterian Church (approx. 5.3 miles away); Battle of Port Gibson (approx. 8.6 miles away); Rabbit Foot Minstrels (approx. 8.6 miles away); Civil War Skirmish (approx. 9.5 miles away); Sunken Trace (approx. 10.4 miles away but has been reported missing); Balmoral Mounds (approx. 14.7 miles away in Louisiana).
 
Categories. Man-Made FeaturesWar, US Civil
 
Windsor Ruins marker has been cleaned up.... image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 26, 2017
3. Windsor Ruins marker has been cleaned up....
Windsor Ruins image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, March 22, 2010
4. Windsor Ruins
Windsor Ruins image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, March 22, 2010
5. Windsor Ruins
Windsor Ruins image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, March 22, 2010
6. Windsor Ruins
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 27, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 2, 2013, by Karl Stelly of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 537 times since then and 66 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 2, 2013, by Karl Stelly of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.   3. submitted on May 26, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.   4, 5, 6. submitted on January 14, 2014, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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