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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Alexandria, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Original Federal Boundary Stone SW 1

 
 
Original Federal Boundary Stone SW 1 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 8, 2014
1. Original Federal Boundary Stone SW 1 Marker
Inscription.
Original Federal Boundary Stone
District of Columbia
Placed 1791 - 1792
Protected by Mt. Vernon Chapter
Daughters of the American Revolution
1916

 
Erected 1916 by Mount Vernon Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Original Federal Boundary Stones marker series.
 
Location. 38° 48.075′ N, 77° 3.265′ W. Marker is in Alexandria, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of Payne Street and Wilkes Street, on the right when traveling north on Payne Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1220 Wilkes Street, Alexandria VA 22314, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 1323 Duke Street – From Slavery to Freedom and Service (approx. 0.2 miles away); Franklin and Armfield Slave Office (approx. 0.2 miles away); Shiloh Baptist Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); A National Cemetery System (approx. 0.2 miles away); Alexandria National Cemetery (approx. 0.2 miles away); "Pursuers of Booth the Assassin"
Original Federal Boundary Stone SW 1 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 8, 2014
2. Original Federal Boundary Stone SW 1 Marker
(approx. 0.2 miles away); L'Overture Hospital HQ (approx. 0.2 miles away); Hooff's Run Bridge (approx. mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Alexandria.
 
More about this marker. This District of Columbia boundary stone is nowhere near today's District of Columbia. It marks the original boundary of the District before Alexandria County (now Arlington County) was retro-ceded back to Virginia.
 
Also see . . .
1.  SW1. Boundary Stones of the District of Columbia. " Around 1904, the stone was moved 225 feet from its original position. When it was reset in the ground, it was rotated such that the sides of the stone marked "Virginia" and "Jurisdiction of the United States" no longer face their respective jurisdictions. The letters on the District face of the stone are smaller than those of the other stones and in a different script." (Submitted on April 9, 2014.) 

2. Marking the Original Boundary of the District of Columbia. DAR Boundary Stones Committee, website. (Submitted on April 9, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 

3. Boundary Markers of the Original District of Columbia in Virginia. (PDF) National
Original Federal Boundary Stone SW 1 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 8, 2014
3. Original Federal Boundary Stone SW 1 Marker
Register of Historic Places Multiple Property Documentation Form. (Submitted on July 24, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraMan-Made Features
 
Original Federal Boundary Stone SW 1 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 8, 2014
4. Original Federal Boundary Stone SW 1
Original Federal Boundary Stone SW 1 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 8, 2014
5. Original Federal Boundary Stone SW 1
Jurisdiction
of the
United States
Original Federal Boundary Stone SW 1 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 8, 2014
6. Original Federal Boundary Stone SW 1
1791
Original Federal Boundary Stone SW 1 image. Click for full size.
National Register of Historic Places
7. Original Federal Boundary Stone SW 1
This diagram of the inscriptions on Boundary Stone SW 1 appears in the National Register Form prepared by Barbara Hynak of the District V Markers Committee, Virginia Daughters of the Revolution.
Payne & Wilkes Street image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 8, 2014
8. Payne & Wilkes Street
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 9, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 899 times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on April 9, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7. submitted on April 10, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   8. submitted on April 9, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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