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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Jemez Springs in Sandoval County, New Mexico — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Jémez State Monument

 
 
Jémez State Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 25, 2014
1. Jémez State Monument Marker
Inscription. The village of Giusewa was occupied by ancestors of the Jémez Indians before the arrival of the Spanish in 1541. Its ruins lie close to those of the great stone mission church of San José de los Jémez, which was built by the Franciscans around 1622.
 
Location. 35° 46.947′ N, 106° 41.241′ W. Marker is in Jemez Springs, New Mexico, in Sandoval County. Marker is on State Road 4 just north of Jemez Springs, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. State Highway 4 is an east-west route, runs mostly north-south through Jemez Springs. The marker is just north of the entrance to the Jémez State Monument. Marker is in this post office area: Jemez Springs NM 87025, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 2 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Evelyn M. Vigil, Phan-Un-Pha-Kee (Young Doe) 1921–1995 (approx. 9.8 miles away); Pueblo of Jémez (approx. 9.8 miles away).
 
More about this marker. The site the marker refers to has had a name change. It is now the Jemez Historic Site.
 
Regarding Jémez State Monument. There is a $3 charge per person to visit the ruins. This includes a written self-guided 24-stop tour and access to a small museum
Jémez State Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 25, 2014
2. Jémez State Monument Marker
in the visitor’s center. It is open from 8:30 to 5 Wednesday through Sunday.
 
Also see . . .
1. Jémez Historic Site. Official website. Excerpt: “Between 1621 and 1625, the Franciscans designed a massive, stonewalled church and convento (priests quarters) at Giusewa. They named their church San José de los Jémez. This mission complex was constructed with Pueblo labor. According to contemporary reports, the construction was "sumptuous and curious" in its design and beauty. The church is unusual for its massive size and rare, octagonal bell tower. Colorful frescos that once decorated the interior walls were revealed during archaeological excavations in 1921 and 1922.” (Submitted on April 26, 2014.) 

2. Jemez Springs History. Excerpt: “When [the Spanish explorer] Coronado made his headquarters near present day Bernalillo, he sent exploring parties in a number of directions. Captain Francisco de Barrionuevo reported visiting seven Jemez towns and said that there were more further north. Some historians believe that there may have been as many as 20 Jemez pueblos in the Jemez Valley at one time.” (Submitted on April 26, 2014.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraNative Americans
 
Ruins of San José de los Jémez Church image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 25, 2014
3. Ruins of San José de los Jémez Church
Remains of the Village of Guisewa image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 25, 2014
4. Remains of the Village of Guisewa
The towers of the present-day Mary Mother of Priests Catholic Church are in the distance. The informational panel reads “Guisewa was a thriving community for at least 200 years prior to the arrival of the Spanish. It was one of the largest and most impressive pueblos in the Jemez area. The pueblo is known to have extended under the present highway and beyond to the site of Villa Coeli. All that is left of the pueblo are these mounds of rock and dirt that mark the spot of ancient homes.”
Kiva image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, March 18, 2009
5. Kiva
One of the kivas associated with the Guisewa Pueblo
San José de los Jémez Mission image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney
6. San José de los Jémez Mission
Panorama of side of mission ruins
Mission Interior image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, March 18, 2009
7. Mission Interior
View of mission church ruins interior, facing altar.
Mission Interior image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, March 18, 2009
8. Mission Interior
View from inside mission church ruins, from altar facing entrance.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 26, 2014, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 300 times since then and 54 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 26, 2014, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on May 12, 2014, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.
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