Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Colorado City in Mitchell County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Comanche Village Massacre

 
 
Comanche Village Massacre Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, April 18, 2014
1. Comanche Village Massacre Marker
Inscription.
In this vicinity
on a bank of the Colorado
October 21, 1840
a Comanche Indian village
was completely destroyed and much
stolen property recovered
including 500 horses
128 Indians were killed
34 were captured
The expedition commanded by
Colonel John Henry Moore
consisted of 90 citizen volunteers
mostly residents of Fayette County
Seventeen friendly Lipan Indians
under Chiefs Castro and Flaco
served as guides
No Texans were killed
and but two wounded

 
Erected 1936 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 995.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Texas 1936 Centennial Markers and Monuments marker series.
 
Location. 32° 23.669′ N, 100° 51.09′ W. Marker is in Colorado City, Texas, in Mitchell County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Houston Street and East 7th Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located south of the swimming pool in Ruddick Park. Marker is in this post office area: Colorado City TX 79512, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 3 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Ruddick Park
Comanche Village Massacre Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney
2. Comanche Village Massacre Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Buffalo Trails (approx. 0.8 miles away); Seven Wells (approx. 4.4 miles away).
 
Categories. Native AmericansWars, US Indian
 
Comanche Village Massacre Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, April 18, 2014
3. Comanche Village Massacre Marker
Lone Wolf Creek is in the distance. A marker at the entrance to Ruddick Park says the creek that runs through the park was named for Chief Lone Wolf of the Kiowa Indians, who camped along the creek banks.
Comanche Village Massacre Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, April 18, 2014
4. Comanche Village Massacre Marker
Another view of marker, far left, just inside the park entrance. Ruddick Park historical marker next to entrance.
Rock Outcropping along Lone Wolf Creek image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, April 18, 2014
5. Rock Outcropping along Lone Wolf Creek
Rock outcropping along the creek where visitors, possibly both historic and prehistoric, have carved their names.
Rock Outcropping along Lone Wolf Creek image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, April 18, 2014
6. Rock Outcropping along Lone Wolf Creek
Rock outcropping along the creek where visitors, possibly both historic and prehistoric, have carved their names.
Lone Wolf Creek image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, April 18, 2014
7. Lone Wolf Creek
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 29, 2014, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. This page has been viewed 635 times since then and 127 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on April 29, 2014, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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