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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Winchester in Clark County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

A Defensive Strategy

 
 
A Defensive Strategy Wayside Exhibit image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly, June 1, 2014
1. A Defensive Strategy Wayside Exhibit
Inscription.
Fortifying Central Kentucky
The small earthwork above was just one part of an overall defensive strategy devised by the Union army to guard against Confederate raids. It was part of a grand plan put forth by Capt. Thomas B. Brooks.

In a letter to his commanding officer, Gen. Quincy A. Gillmore, Capt. Brooks proposed that "...small defensive works be erected at the most important Fords, Ferries, Mountain Passes and Towns in this District South and East of this post [Lexington], or in other words that the present system for the defense of the Rail Road be extended southward."

The defense of the railroad Brooks alluded to was the systematic fortification of the railroad's most vulnerable spots - the bridges and trestles. Brooks envisioned a similar series of defenses for the protection of the fords, ferries, and bridges on the Kentucky River and other vulnerable areas.

Capt. Brooks' Plan
Brooks' plan called for the construction of a series of enclosed earthworks protected by stockades. Blockhouses in the center of the earthwork were designed to act as refuges in the event of an assault. Small numbers of Federal soldiers would garrison the forts. When needed, citizens and home guards would supplement the regular troops. Brooks saw these small earthworks not only as defensive positions
General Quincy A. Gillmore (seated, center) and his staff, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, 1864 image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly, June 1, 2014
2. General Quincy A. Gillmore (seated, center) and his staff, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, 1864
but also as rallying points for the Union men of Kentucky.

At least part of the plan developed by Capt. Thomas Brooks was put into action. Earthworks were constructed along the Kentucky River at Boonesboro, Clay's Ferry, and Tate's Creek and overlooking the bridges at Frankfort and Camp Nelson.
 
Erected by The Winchester/Clark County Tourism Commission.
 
Location. 37° 53.385′ N, 84° 15.553′ W. Marker is near Winchester, Kentucky, in Clark County. Marker can be reached from Ford Road/4 Mile Road (Kentucky Route 1924) 1.2 miles south of Boonesboro Road (Kentucky Route 627), on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. The exhibit can be reached from the parking area on KY Route 1924. The trailhead is at the edge of the parking area here. It is a ½ mile hike up the trail to the top of the hill where the fort is. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1250 Ford Road, Winchester KY 40391, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Thomas B. Brooks, Army Engineer (here, next to this marker); An Unrealized Plan (here, next to this marker); Common Cliffside Plants (within shouting distance of this marker); Rock and Man
Fort Boone in Frankfort was built to protect this Kentucky River bridge image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly, June 1, 2014
3. Fort Boone in Frankfort was built to protect this Kentucky River bridge
(within shouting distance of this marker); Building the Earthwork (within shouting distance of this marker); The Eye of the Rich Land (within shouting distance of this marker); The Quest for Land (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Inside the Earthwork (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Winchester.
 
More about this marker. This marker is part of the historic site known as the "Civil War Fort at Boonesboro." CAUTION: The climb up the hill is VERY steep. It involves a change in elevation of 230 feet. Not recommended for people that are not in good physical shape or condition.
 
Also see . . .  Civil War Fort at Boonesboro. (Submitted on June 21, 2014.)
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesMan-Made FeaturesWar, US Civil
 
Defenses of the Kentucky River image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly, June 1, 2014
4. Defenses of the Kentucky River
View of the Fort image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly, June 1, 2014
5. View of the Fort
This view shows the reconstructed earthwork at the top of the hill; photo taken from the site of the wayside exhibit marker.
View from the Earthwork image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly, June 1, 2014
6. View from the Earthwork
In this view, the marker can be seen near the center, just outside the treeline.
A View from the Fort image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly, June 1, 2014
7. A View from the Fort
Looking in a different direction from the fort at the top of the hill.
Cannon in the Earthwork image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly, June 1, 2014
8. Cannon in the Earthwork
This is in the earthwork at the very top of the hill.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 20, 2014, by Karl Stelly of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 304 times since then and 11 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on June 20, 2014, by Karl Stelly of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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