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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Parsons in Tucker County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Williams v. Board of Education Case

 
 
<i>Williams v. Board of Education Case</i> Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 22, 2014
1. Williams v. Board of Education Case Marker
Inscription. In 1892, Coketon Colored School teacher Carrie Williams sued the local school board for equal pay. She was represented by the first African American lawyer in WV, J.R. Clifford, in front of Judge Hoke. Local jury found for her and she won appeal at WV Supreme Court. This early civil rights case affirmed equal school terms for African Americans in WV.
 
Erected 2011 by Tucker County Historical Society & Friends of Blackwater, and the West Virginia Archives and History.
 
Location. 39° 5.808′ N, 79° 40.812′ W. Marker is in Parsons, West Virginia, in Tucker County. Marker is on First Street (U.S. 219) west of Walnut Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. It is at the courthouse. Marker is in this post office area: Parsons WV 26287, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Tucker County Courthouse (a few steps from this marker); Corrick's Ford Battle (a few steps from this marker); Parsons / Corrick's Ford (within shouting distance of this marker); Corricks Ford Battlefield (approx. half a mile away); The Corrick House (approx. 0.6 miles away);
<i>Williams v. Board of Education Case</i> Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 22, 2014
2. Williams v. Board of Education Case Marker
Corricks Ford (approx. 0.6 miles away); a different marker also named Corricks Ford (approx. 0.7 miles away); a different marker also named Corrick's Ford (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Parsons.
 
Regarding Williams v. Board of Education Case. The law said the school year was eight months, but only five months’ worth of money was allocated to the colored school for the teacher’s salary. The schoolteacher taught the full eight months, and then sued for the missing three months’ salary. She won because the school board did not follow the law and she did.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .  The Carrie Williams Case. Excerpt from the 1898 WV Supreme Court ruling: “1. The law of this state does not authorize boards of education to discriminate between white and colored schools in the same district as to length of term to be taught. 2. Where a teacher has been employed to teach a colored school by the trustees thereof, under the supervision of the board of education, and she teaches the same the full term of the other primary schools in the same district, satisfactorily to the patrons
Marker at the Tucker County Courthouse image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 22, 2014
3. Marker at the Tucker County Courthouse
of such school, she is entitled to pay for her whole term of service; and the board of education cannot escape the payment thereof by interposing a plea that it had, by reason of the school being a colored school, limited the term thereof to a shorter period than the white schools in the same district. Such discrimination, being made merely on account of color, cannot be recognized or tolerated, as it is contrary to public policy and the law of the land.” (Submitted on June 26, 2014.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil RightsEducation
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 26, 2014, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 358 times since then and 40 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 26, 2014, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
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