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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Opelika in Lee County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

African-American Rosemere Cemetery

Lee County

 
 
African-American Rosemere Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 6, 2014
1. African-American Rosemere Cemetery Marker
Inscription.
Side 1
On February 9, 1876, the City of Opelika paid D.B. Preston $80 for two acres of land to establish an African-American section of Rosemere Cemetery. This rectangular area of the cemetery contains 176 blocks, with 16 being partial blocks. A full block has 32 grave spaces. Dr. John Wesley Darden (1876-1949) settled in Opelika in 1903. He became the first African-American doctor within a 30 mile radius. He married Miss Maude Jean Logan. After they were married, Dr. and Mrs. Darden made house calls in his horse and buggy. Dr. Darden opened a drug store on Avenue A and recruited his brother, John Benjamin "J.B." Darden, as his partner. J.B. had recently graduated and was a registered pharmacist. Two other doctors are also buried here: Dr. William F. Clark (1882-1966) and Dr. Eugene A. Lindsey (1888-1955).
(Continued on other side)
Side 2
(Continued from other side)
Willie Bessie Brady (1904-1999), known as Miss Bessie, taught in a private, one room school. Although without a college education, she taught grades one through twelve. After school attendance laws were enacted, Miss Bessie had to close her school, but because of overcrowding at the public school, she was later allowed to teach with a V Certificate. She taught Kindergarten at
African-American Rosemere Cemetery Marker (reverse) image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 6, 2014
2. African-American Rosemere Cemetery Marker (reverse)
the first public Kindergarten for African-American children at the Central Parks and Recreation center in Opelika. Elder Brooks, Sr. (1908-1970) was the first African-American licensed plumber and electrician in Opelika. He was also among the first African Americans to vote. More than 50 veterans are buried in this section. They include veterans of WWI, WWII, Korea, and Vietnam. Seven Ministers of the Gospel who guided the community are at rest here.

Listed in the Alabama Historic Cemetery Register, June 14, 2011

 
Erected 2013 by the City of Opelika.
 
Location. 32° 38.025′ N, 85° 23.294′ W. Marker is in Opelika, Alabama, in Lee County. Marker is at the intersection of Long Street and Auburn Street, on the left when traveling north on Long Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1710 Long Street, Opelika AL 36801, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. New Rosemere Cemetery (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Old Rosemere Cemetery (about 700 feet away); Darden House (approx. 0.4 miles away); Killgore Scholarships / Some Terms of Scholarships
African-American Rosemere Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 6, 2014
3. African-American Rosemere Cemetery
(approx. one mile away); Lee County Courthouse / Lee County Probate Judges (approx. one mile away); Railroad Avenue Historic District (approx. one mile away); South Railroad Avenue (approx. one mile away); Rosseau's Raid to East Alabama (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Opelika.
 
Also see . . .  Opelika's Rosemere cemeteries dedicated to state historic register oanow.com. (Submitted on July 6, 2014, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. African AmericansCemeteries & Burial SitesEducationScience & Medicine
 
Grave Marker of Dr. & Mrs. John W. Darden image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 6, 2014
4. Grave Marker of Dr. & Mrs. John W. Darden
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 6, 2014, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 431 times since then and 65 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 6, 2014, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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