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Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Battle of Frederick

“Best little battle of the war”

 

—Early's 1864 Washington Raid —

 
Battle of Frederick Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 28, 2014
1. Battle of Frederick Marker
Inscription.
(preface)
Confederate Gen. Jubal A. Early drove Union Gen. David Hunter into West Virginia after the Battle of Lynchburg, Va., clearing the Shenandoah Valley of Federal forces. To draw Union troops from Petersburg, Early launched a raid on Washington D.C., on June 23, 1864. Union Gen. Lew Wallace delayed the Confederates at Monocacy, giving Petersburg reinforcements time to stiffen the capital's defenses. Early probed briefly on July 11-12 and withdrew to the Shenandoah Valley, where he stopped his pursuers at Cool Spring on July 17-18. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant then detached forces under Gen. Philip H. Sheridan to crush Early.

(main text)
This area was farm fields in 1864. Here, a make-shift force under Union Gen. Lew Wallace blocked Confederate cavalry from occupying Frederick on July 7. Wallace had assembled the Federal force at Monocacy Junction, about three miles south, and then ordered the units here. The fight began about 4 P.M. when Gen. Jubal A. Early's army under Frederick native Bradley T. Johnson approached. It raged until darkness fell four hours later. Col. Charles Gilpin, 3rd Maryland Potomac Home Brigade, commanded the Federal defense including the 8th Illinois Cavalry and 159th Ohio Mounted Infantry. The Baltimore Light Artillery under Baltimore native Lt. Peter Leary, Jr., supported
Battle of Frederick Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 28, 2014
2. Battle of Frederick Marker
Gilpin. On the Confederate side, Johnson's force included the 1st and 2nd Maryland Cavalry and four Virginia cavalry regiments. After darkness ended the fighting, the Federals held their position until the next night and then withdrew to Monocacy Junction when the rest of Early's army approached. Wallace was pleased with his men's performance here. "Think I had the best little battle of the war," he reported. "Our men did not retreat, but held their own. The enemy were repulsed three times."

As the fight ensuded, reinforcements and ammunition were rushed to Wallace from Baltimore. On July 9, at the Battle of Monocacy, Wallace's force held for a day against Early's much larger Confederate army. Union resistance here and at the Battle of Monocacy gave Federal authorities in Washington time to reinforce the city's defenses against Early's attack.


 
Erected by Maryland Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 24.946′ N, 77° 26.266′ W. Marker is in Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of West Patrick Street (U.S. 40) and Linden Avenue, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker
Battle of Frederick Map<br>You Are Here image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 28, 2014
3. Battle of Frederick Map
You Are Here
Close-up of map on marker
is in the parking lot of the Red Horse Restaurant, in the shadow of the Red Horse Sign, near the ramp to US 15 South from US 40 (W Patrick St). Marker is at or near this postal address: 996 West Patrick Street, Frederick MD 21703, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Gettysburg Campaign (approx. 0.8 miles away); Major General George Gordon Meade (approx. 0.8 miles away); Meade Takes Command (approx. 0.8 miles away); Barbara Fritchie Cabins & Tea Room (approx. 1.1 miles away); Mary Quantrill's Stand (approx. 1.1 miles away); Home of Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney (approx. 1.2 miles away); Mullinix Park (approx. 1.2 miles away); Company A, 1st Battalion, 115th Infantry Regiment Memorial (approx. 1.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frederick.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
General Lew Wallace image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 28, 2014
4. General Lew Wallace
(Future author of Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ)
Close up of LOC photo on marker
General Jubal A. Early image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 28, 2014
5. General Jubal A. Early
close-up of LOC photo on marker
General Bradley T. Johnson image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 28, 2014
6. General Bradley T. Johnson
close-up of LOC photo on marker
Lieutenant Peter Leary, Jr. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 28, 2014
7. Lieutenant Peter Leary, Jr.
From Frederick W. Wild, Memoirs and History of Capt. F.W. Alexander's Baltimore Battery (1912)
Close-up of photo on marker
Red Horse Restaurant Sign image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 28, 2014
8. Red Horse Restaurant Sign
Weathervane image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 28, 2014
9. Weathervane
Inside the Red Horse Restaurant
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 29, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 615 times since then and 132 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on August 29, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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