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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Atlantic Beach in Carteret County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Hoop Pole Creek

Ferrying Troops and Equipment at High Tide

 

—Burnside Expedition —

 
Hoop Pole Creek Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 16, 2014
1. Hoop Pole Creek Marker
Inscription.
In March 1862, Union Gen. John G. Parke’s brigade of Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside’ Coastal Division advanced from New Bern to capture Beaufort Harbor and Fort Macon. During March 22-26, Parke’s forces took possession of Carolina City, Morehead City and Beaufort. Fort Macon’s Confederate garrison refused to surrender, forcing Parke to begin siege operations against the fort.

On March 29, a detachment of the 4th Rhode Island Infantry crossed Bogue Sound from Carolina City and established an outpost camp on Bogue Banks here at Hoop Pole Creek, five miles from Fort Macon. This camp became the base from which Parke conducted the siege. Over the next two weeks a total of 22 companies of Union infantry and artillery crossed over to the camp from Carolina City. Three batteries of siege cannons and mortars and their ammunition were also ferried across the sound to the camp, using old barges, scows and one light-draft stern-wheel steamer. Bogue Sound and Hoop Pole Creek were so shallow that Parke could only ferry over his troops and equipment at high tide.

Once unloaded from the vessels, the heavy artillery had to be manhandled through the muddy salt marsh and sand to reach the camp. From Hoop Pole Creek, the artillery was then dragged almost four miles up the beach and set up in artillery emplacements from which to fire
Close up of the map on the Hoop Pole Creek Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 16, 2014
2. Close up of the map on the Hoop Pole Creek Marker
on Fort Macon. On April 25, Parke’s forces bombarded Fort Macon for eleven hours, forcing the Confederates to surrender the following day.

(captions)
(lower left) Hoop Pole Creek and environs.
(upper right) Gen. John G. Parke; Moving cannon through the marsh. - Sketch courtesy Brian Kraus
 
Erected by North Carolina Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the North Carolina Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 34° 42.091′ N, 76° 45.111′ W. Marker is in Atlantic Beach, North Carolina, in Carteret County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of West Fort Macon Road and Atlantic Station Shopping Center, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. The marker is located on the east side of the Atlantic Station Shopping Center parking lot. Marker is at or near this postal address: 916 W Fort Macon Rd, Atlantic Beach NC 28512, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Hoop Pole Creek: A Coastal Nature Preserve (here, next to this marker); Hoophole Creek (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (approx. 1.4 miles away); Carolina City
Hoop Pole Creek Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 16, 2014
3. Hoop Pole Creek Marker
(approx. 1.5 miles away); Camp Glenn (approx. 1.6 miles away); Siege of Fort Macon (approx. 1.6 miles away); a different marker also named Carolina City (approx. 1.6 miles away); N.C. State Highway Patrol (approx. 1.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Atlantic Beach.
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US CivilWaterways & Vessels
 
Hoop Pole Creek-Walk way to the creek image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 16, 2014
4. Hoop Pole Creek-Walk way to the creek
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 11, 2014, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 261 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 11, 2014, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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