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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Galveston in Galveston County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Juneteenth

 
 
Juneteenth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Samuel Collins III, June 21, 2014
1. Juneteenth Marker
Inscription. Commemorated annually on June 19th, Juneteenth is the oldest known celebration of the end of slavery in the U.S. The Emancipation Proclamation, issued by President Abraham Lincoln on Sep. 22, 1862, announced, "That on the 1st day of January. A.D. 1863, all person held as slaves within any state…in rebellion against the U.S. shall be then, thenceforward and forever free." However, it would take the Civil War and passage of the 13th Amendment to the Constitution to end the brutal institution of African American slavery.

After the Civil War ended in April 1865 most slaves in Texas were still unaware of their freedom. This began to change when Union troops arrived in Galveston. Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger, commanding officer, District of Texas, from his headquarters in the Osterman building (Strand and 22nd St.), read 'General Order No. 3' on June 19, 1865. The order stated "The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves." With this notice, reconstruction era Texas began.

Freed African Americans observed "Emancipation Day," as it was first known, as early as 1866 in Galveston. As community gatherings grew across Texas, celebrations
Juneteenth Marker June 19, 2014 image. Click for full size.
By Samuel Collins III
2. Juneteenth Marker June 19, 2014
The Juneteenth Marker program was not held until June 21, 2014, but the marker was placed in the ground on June 19, 2014.
included parades, prayer, singing and readings of the proclamation. In the mid-20th century, community celebrations gave way to more private commemorations. A re-emergence of public observance helped Juneteenth become a state holiday in 1979. Initially observed in Texas, this landmark event's legacy is evident today by worldwide commemorations that celebrate freedom and the triumph of the human spirit.
 
Erected 2014 by Texas Historical Commission.
 
Location. 29° 18.438′ N, 94° 47.601′ W. Marker is in Galveston, Texas, in Galveston County. Marker is at the intersection of Strand Street and 22nd Street, on the right when traveling east on Strand Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2200 Strand Street, Galveston TX 77550, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Trueheart-Adriance Building (was within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported missing. ); The Stewart Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Mallory-Produce Building (within shouting distance of this marker); 1871 Thomas Jefferson League Building (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Leon & H. Blum Co. Building
Juneteenth marker dedication program 2014 image. Click for full size.
3. Juneteenth marker dedication program 2014
(about 600 feet away); Battle of Galveston (about 600 feet away); Hutchings, Sealy & Co. Buildings (about 600 feet away); Nicholas J. Clayton (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Galveston.
 
More about this marker. The marker was placed in the ground on June 19, 2014. The marker dedication ceremony was on June 21, 2014.
 
Regarding Juneteenth. Juneteenth celebrates the evolution of the country to a more perfect union. We all should celebrate freedom and what this meant for America. There are other Emancipation Day celebrations in America, but each of those celebrated emancipation while there were still slaves in other areas in the country. When the announcement about the end of slavery was made in Texas on June 19, 1865 it represented the last state (Texas) and territory in the U.S. with enslaved people finally freeing those enslaved men, women and children.
 
Also see . . .
1. Houston Chronicle Juneteenth Marker article. (Submitted on September 19, 2014, by Samuel Collins III of Hitchcock, Texas.)
2. 1998 article about possible marker location at 22nd and Strand. (Submitted on September 19, 2014, by Samuel Collins III of Hitchcock, Texas.)
3. Andy Hall blog about Juneteenth Marker program
Letter from Texas Governor Rick Perry image. Click for full size.
By Hank Thierry
4. Letter from Texas Governor Rick Perry
. (Submitted on September 19, 2014, by Samuel Collins III of Hitchcock, Texas.)
4. Juneteenth History blog by Andy Hall. (Submitted on September 20, 2014, by Samuel Collins III of Hitchcock, Texas.)
5. PBS Special Lidia Celebrates America: Freedom and Independence. Click the link and fast forward to minute 21 to see the segment on Juneteenth. (Submitted on September 28, 2014, by Samuel Collins III of Hitchcock, Texas.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil RightsWar, US Civil
 
Juneteenth Marker image. Click for full size.
Texas Historical Commission, June 21, 2014
5. Juneteenth Marker
THC Chairman Matthew Kreisle, THC Executive Director Mark Wolfe and THC State Board of Review Chair Sam Collins III.
Southwest Corner of 2200 Strand intersection where marker is located. image. Click for full size.
By Samuel Collins III
6. Southwest Corner of 2200 Strand intersection where marker is located.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 16, 2014, by Samuel Collins III of Hitchcock, Texas. This page has been viewed 475 times since then and 85 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on September 19, 2014, by Samuel Collins III of Hitchcock, Texas.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on September 20, 2014, by Samuel Collins III of Hitchcock, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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