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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Blackwell in Coke County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Indian Rock Shelters

 
 
Indian Rock Shelters Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, September 26, 2014
1. Indian Rock Shelters Marker
Inscription.  Throughout this area during the last several centuries, rock ledges gave protection to Lipan, Kickapoo, Comanche, and Kiowa Indians. In one typical shelter archeologists found evidence of 3 periods of occupation, plus numerous intricate petroglyphs (rock carvings). River shells, turkey and deer bones, flint knives, scrapers, and points lay about the area. One of several hearths (2' x 3' in size) consisted of small pieces of sandstone lining a natural rock trough. On the highest level was found green bottle glass from nearby Fort Chadbourne (1852-1867).
 
Erected 1970 by Texas State Historical Survey Committee. (Marker Number 2637.)
 
Location. 32° 0.185′ N, 100° 16.537′ W. Marker is near Blackwell, Texas, in Coke County. Marker is on U.S. 277 0.2 miles south of McDonald Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Bronte TX 76933, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Southern Overland Mail, 1858-1861 (approx. 0.9 miles away); Route of the Southern Overland Mail Line
Indian Rock Shelters Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, September 26, 2014
2. Indian Rock Shelters Marker
On east side of US 277 just south of McDonald Road
(approx. 2.2 miles away); Fort Chadbourne (approx. 3.4 miles away); James Franklin Byrd (approx. 7.7 miles away); Hayrick (approx. 7.8 miles away); Bronte Veterans Memorial (approx. 8.1 miles away); Bronte Depot (approx. 8.1 miles away); Fort Chadbourne C.S.A. / Texas Civil War Frontier Defense (approx. 8.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Blackwell.
 
Additional comments.
1. Picture-Writing of Texas Indians in Coke County
“Coke County
Site No. 151

     Located in a sandstone ledge, along a stream in the northeast corner of the county, is a small shelter that has some petroglyphs and abrading marks on its wall and roof. The shelter, which faces north, measures 13x11x8 feet.
     The midden deposit at this site was excavated and report thereon published by E.B. Sayles (Sayles, E.B. A Rock Shelter in Coke County, Texas. Archaeological and Paleontological Society, Abilene, September, 1930, Vol. II, pp. 33-40, Pls. 4 and 5). Reference is made to that report for further details.
     Some
Indian Rock Shelters Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, September 26, 2014
3. Indian Rock Shelters Marker
View to east across US 277
of the lines have rounded bottoms about the size of the forefinger. Their depth varies from ½ to 3/4 of an inch. Other lines, narrower and shallower, apparently were carved with a sharp implement.
     The fact that the shelter is located near an old army post---established in 1852 and abandoned in 1867---and that glass was found in the upper level of the midden deposit, does not prove that the petroglyphs are historic. They show no evidence of white contact, or modification; neither do the lower levels of the midden deposit. It seems, therefore, that the abrading marks and carvings are prehistoric.”

Source (Public Domain): Jackson, A.T. “Picture-Writing of Texas Indians.” The University of Texas Publication. March 1, 1938: 286.
    — Submitted October 1, 2014, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.

 
Categories. Anthropology & ArchaeologyNative Americans
 
View to northeast image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, September 26, 2014
4. View to northeast
View to south along US 277 image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, September 26, 2014
5. View to south along US 277
 

More. Search the internet for Indian Rock Shelters.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 1, 2014, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 464 times since then and 41 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on October 1, 2014, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.
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