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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Spicer in Kandiyohi County, Minnesota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Victory Dance

 
 
Victory Dance Marker image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, August 27, 2014
1. Victory Dance Marker
Inscription. Ojibwe and Dakota nations had a long history of conflict in what would become Minnesota. Both Dakota and Ojibwe people contended for the control of the abundant natural resources in the future Kandiyohi County area that played an economic role in the global business of the fur trade. Sites in the area became culturally significant through associations with conflict.

This Dakota campsite was very important. In 1857, Andrew Holes and William B. Cartledge of New London witnessed a party of Dakota dancing here to celebrate victory over the Ojibwe.

This project has been financed in part with funds provided by
the State of Minnesota through the Minnesota Historical Society from the Arts and
Cultural Heritage Fund and the Kandiyohi County Historical Society.

 
Erected by the State of Minnesota through the Minnesota Historical Society and the Kandiyohi County Historical Society.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Minnesota Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 45° 14.083′ N, 94° 59.553′ W. Marker is near Spicer, Minnesota, in Kandiyohi County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of 113th Avenue Northeast (County
Victory Dance Marker image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, August 27, 2014
2. Victory Dance Marker
Highway 10) and County Highway 9, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is along the highway frontage road southeast of the intersection. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3725 113th Avenue Northeast, Spicer MN 56288, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Olof Olson Haugen (approx. mile away); Spicer (approx. 2.6 miles away); Veterans Memorial (approx. 2.6 miles away); Little Crow's Camp (approx. 2.7 miles away); This Historical Inclosure (approx. 4.8 miles away); Lundborg-Broberg State Monument (approx. 4.8 miles away); The West Lake Massacre (approx. 4.8 miles away); Lake Florida Mission Covenant Church (approx. 4.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Spicer.
 
More about this marker. The marker has the Historic Site seal of the Kandiyohi County Historical Society 1895.
 
Also see . . .
1. Ojibwe. Wikipedia entry. (Submitted on October 17, 2014.) 

2. Sioux. Wikipedia entry. (Submitted on October 17, 2014.) 

3. Ojibwe Culture. "...the Ojibwe of northern Wisconsin continued to distrust the Americans and often traded with British traders across the border in Canada. They also continued to harbor a hatred for the Dakota, and the
Victory Dance Marker image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, August 27, 2014
3. Victory Dance Marker
Henderson Lake is beyond the marker.
war between the two tribes intensified in the early 1800s." (Submitted on October 17, 2014.) 

4. Battle of the Brule. Wikipedia entry. "...the Battle of the Brule was an example of the type of ongoing conflict the two nations were engaged in during the 18th and early 19th centuries. This continued warfare between the Dakota and Ojibwe figured heavily in U.S. government policy in the Wisconsin Territory. The Treaty of Prairie du Chien (1825) had been arranged with the pretext of creating peace between the two nations, and in later treaties and negotiations the government repeatedly demanded the two groups end hostilities so white settlers would see Wisconsin as a peaceful region." (Submitted on October 17, 2014.) 

5. The Ojibwe Native Americans. "The Ojibwe had little conflict with the United States during their reign, even after Fort Snelling was built in Minnesota to try to section off the Dakota from the Ojibwe. This may have been because they knew they had little chance of victory over the numerous, technologically advanced settlers. Although they presented little direct problem to the whites, they still went on attacking the Dakota as the hostilities between the two tribes continued on." (Submitted on October 17, 2014.) 

6. Ojibwe and Sioux Beginnings. The Sioux Massacre at Fort St. Charles, 1736. "After the massacre... French traders at La Pointe tried to halt the fighting, but this had been coming for years, and neither the Dakota nor the Ojibwe would listen. The war was on, and this was just the beginning." (Submitted on October 17, 2014.) 
 
Additional keywords. Chippewa; Sioux
 
Categories. Native AmericansWars, US Indian
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 17, 2014, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 231 times since then and 46 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 17, 2014, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin.
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