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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Poolesville in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

An Ideal Crossing

 
 
An Ideal Crossing Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 7, 2007
1. An Ideal Crossing Marker
Inscription. The Potomac River is calm and narrow here, making it an ideal location for a ferry crossing. In 1791 Edwards Ferry began to operate here, connecting Maryland farmers to the Goose Creek Canal in Virginia and to the Leesburg markets. The ferry closed in 1836 but the community that grew around it continued, carrying on the name. Over time, a general store, a warehouse, and 36 residents composed the Edwards Ferry community. With the coming of the C&O Canal the small village prospered from the increase in commerce.

(caption) During the Civil War, Edwards Ferry connected Union Maryland with Confederate Virginia. Harper’s Weekly depicted Union troops passing through Edwards Ferry in October 1861. Many troops and supplies from both sides crossed the river here throughout the war.

(caption) The crumbling Jarboe’s Store remains here today. It was a general store and post office operated by Eugene E. Jarboe in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Flood damage in 1996 forced the National Park Service to partially tear down the unstable structure.
 
Erected by Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park, National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal marker
Marker and Park Sign image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 7, 2007
2. Marker and Park Sign
Photographer is on the canal towpath. A small parking lot and the Edward’s Ferry boat ramp is to the right. Hidden in the shadows on the left is the remains of Jarboe’s store.
series.
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 39° 6.222′ N, 77° 28.35′ W. Marker was in Poolesville, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Touch for map. Marker was in this post office area: Poolesville MD 20837, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this location, measured as the crow flies. At the Junction of War and Peace: (here, next to this marker); Edwards Ferry (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Edward’s Ferry (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Elizabeth Mills Riverfront Park (approx. 1.1 miles away in Virginia); a different marker also named Edwards Ferry (approx. 1.2 miles away in Virginia); Ice House (approx. 2.1 miles away in Virginia); Carriage House (approx. 2.1 miles away in Virginia); Red Rock Wilderness Overlook Regional Park (approx. 2.1 miles away in Virginia). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Poolesville.
 
Regarding An Ideal Crossing. This marker has been replaced with the "At the Junction of Peace and War" marker.
 
Also see . . .  Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Park. (Submitted on July 15, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
 
Additional comments.
Lockkeeper’s House at Edward’s Ferry image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 7, 2007
3. Lockkeeper’s House at Edward’s Ferry

1. Goose Creek Canal
Some two tenths of a mile downstream from Lock 25 and Edwards Ferry was the Goose Creek River Lock. This was designed to allow boat traffic to leave the canal, cross the Patomac, and enter Goose Creek. On that side of the river a similar set of locks were built to allow barge traffic into Loudoun County as far as Aldie, in theory. The Goose Creek Canal was chartered in 1832 with notables such as Charles Mercer and George Carter involved. After some twenty-two years, the project was still incomplete. Just over twelve miles were complete and the company was out of funds. Today one can still see the lock works about a half mile from the mouth of Goose Creek.
    — Submitted August 17, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. War, US CivilWaterways & Vessels
 
Lock 25 at Edward’s Ferry image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 7, 2007
4. Lock 25 at Edward’s Ferry
The Remains of Jarboe’s Store image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 7, 2007
5. The Remains of Jarboe’s Store
Remains of Lock Number 25 image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 7, 2007
6. Remains of Lock Number 25
The red stones used to construct the lock are sandstone quarried upstream from Seneca, MD. Originally configured to handle one canal boat at a time, in the 1870s it was extended to pass two canal boats at once.
Crumbling Structure of Lock 25 image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 7, 2007
7. Crumbling Structure of Lock 25
For the expansion of the lock in the 1870s, timber cribs were used to support the extended walls. The lose stones are result of the that supporting structure rotting away over time.
Edward's Ferry Seen from Virginia image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 17, 2007
8. Edward's Ferry Seen from Virginia
The Elizabeth Mills Riverfront Park, part of the Loudoun County Park system, recently opened with a foot trail to the mouth of Goose Creek. Directly in the center along the Maryland shore is the boat ramp seen in photo nine below.
Our Army at Edward's Ferry,<br> on the Potomac, opposite Leesburg image. Click for full size.
By Harper's Weekly, 1861
9. Our Army at Edward's Ferry,
on the Potomac, opposite Leesburg
During the Civil War, Edwards Ferry connected Union Maryland with Confederate Virginia. Harper’s Weekly depicted Union troops passing through Edwards Ferry in October 1861. Many troops and supplies from both sides crossed the river here throughout the war.
Illustration from Harper's Weekly, November 9, 1861, page 710
Boat Ramp, Potomac River, and the Virginia Shore image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 7, 2007
10. Boat Ramp, Potomac River, and the Virginia Shore
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 14, 2007, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,186 times since then and 89 times this year. Last updated on October 27, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on July 14, 2007, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   6, 7. submitted on July 15, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   8. submitted on August 17, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   9. submitted on October 29, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   10. submitted on July 14, 2007, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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