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Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Battle Begins

Monocacy National Battlefield

 
 
Battle Begins Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 2, 2014
1. Battle Begins Marker
Inscription.
About 8 o'clock a dash was made by the enemy under cover of artillery fire, to drive us from out position, hoping to gain the pike, and proceed on their way to Washington. — Private Daniel B. Freeman, Company G, 10th Vermont Infantry

On the morning of July 9, 1864, Confederate skirmishers—followed by General Ramseur's division of 2,000 men—marched down the Georgetown Pike toward the Monocacy River. Waiting for them at Monocacy Junction was a Union detachment of 275 men commanded by Lieutenant Davis. A Union force of about 3,300—made up of veterans of the 3rd Division, VI Corps, Army of the Potomac—was positioned on the heights across the river while another 3,000 troops guarded fords and the Baltimore Pike. As hard as the Confederates fought, the Union maintained its strong hold on the junction, forcing Early to find another location to cross the river.
 
Erected by Monocacy National Battlefield.
 
Location. 39° 22.622′ N, 77° 23.724′ W. Marker is in Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is at the intersection of Urbana Pike (Maryland Route 355) and New Technology Way on Urbana Pike. Touch for map. Located outside the Visitors Center at Monocacy
Battle Begins Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 2, 2014
2. Battle Begins Marker
Best Farm and the Geogetown Pike in the Distance.
National Battlefield. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5201 Urbana Pike, Frederick MD 21704, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A Bold Plan (a few steps from this marker); The Lost Order (a few steps from this marker); 1862 Antietam Campaign (a few steps from this marker); Monocacy Battlefield (a few steps from this marker); Battle of Monocacy (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); This Boulder Overlooks the Monocacy Battlefield (about 500 feet away); Headquarters of Generals Robert E. Lee (about 500 feet away); Nick of Time (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frederick.
 
Also see . . .  Monocacy National Battlefield. National Park Service (Submitted on November 3, 2014.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
George E. Davis image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 2, 2014
3. George E. Davis
First Lieutenant George E. Davis commanded the Union's first line of Defense at the junction.
Close-up of photo on marker
James B. Ricketts image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 2, 2014
4. James B. Ricketts
Brigadier General James B. Ricketts, commanded the 3rd Division, VI Corps, who held the heights.
Close-up of photo on marker
Stephen D. Ramseur image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 2, 2014
5. Stephen D. Ramseur
Major General Stephen D. Ramseur commanded the initial Confederate advance.
Close-up of photo on marker
Georgetown (Urbana) Pike image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 2, 2014
6. Georgetown (Urbana) Pike
Georgetown Pike, about 1910, looking south toward the bridge.
Battle Map<br>(You Are Here) image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 2, 2014
7. Battle Map
(You Are Here)
Battle Begins Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 1, 2016
8. Battle Begins Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 24, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 3, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 441 times since then and 64 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on November 3, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   8. submitted on July 24, 2016, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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