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Fort Scott in Bourbon County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Fort Scott

 
 
Fort Scott Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., March 24, 2016
1. Fort Scott Marker
Sporting new blue background color that the KSHS has been using over the past few years
Inscription. This western outpost, named for General Winfield Scott, was established by U.S. Dragoons in 1842. The fort was located on the military road that marked the "permanent Indian frontier" stretching from Minnesota to Louisiana and stood midway between Fort Leavenworth and Fort Gibson. By 1853 the Indian frontier had moved west and troops were withdrawn. Two years later the buildings were sold at auction, and they became the town of Fort Scott.

From 1855 to 1860 this area stood at the heart of the territorial struggle over slavery,and in 1858 the town was raided by Jayhawkers attempting to free one of their members from jail. One local resident was killed. With the onset of the Civil War, Fort Scott was reactivated to serve as the Union headquarters and supply depot for southeast Kansas. The town was threatened by Confederate guerrillas from Missouri until 1865. After the War ended, the post was abandoned.

In 1869 the army returned, headquartering troops in Fort Scott to protect railroad construction in southeast Kansas. In 1873, the post was abandoned. The restored fort is now a National Historic Site administered by the National Park Service.
 
Erected by Kansas State Historical Society and Kansas Department of Transportation. (Marker Number 48.)
 
Marker series.
Fort Scott Marker image. Click for full size.
By Thomas Onions, June 26, 2009
2. Fort Scott Marker
Closeup of Marker
This marker is included in the Kansas Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 37° 50.601′ N, 94° 42.435′ W. Marker is in Fort Scott, Kansas, in Bourbon County. Marker is at the intersection of National Avenue and Stanton Street, on the right when traveling north on National Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Scott KS 66701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 20th Century Veterans' Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Historic Fort Scott (within shouting distance of this marker); Medal of Honor (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Star Clothing House (about 400 feet away); Milrose Block (about 500 feet away); Fort Scott Yesterday (about 500 feet away); Western Hotel: Symbol of Strife (about 500 feet away); Civil War Town (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Scott.
 
Also see . . .
1. Bleeding Kansas. This National Park Service link describes the history and effects of Bleeding Kansas on Fort Scott and its environs. (Submitted on June 27, 2009, by Thomas Onions of Olathe, Kansas.) 

2. Fort Scott Area Chamber of Commerce. This is the official link for the Fort Scott Chamber of Commerce. (Submitted on June 27, 2009, by Thomas Onions of Olathe, Kansas.)
Fort Scott Marker image. Click for full size.
By Thomas Onions, June 26, 2009
3. Fort Scott Marker
Area shot of marker
 
 
Additional keywords. Bleeding Kansas
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesSettlements & SettlersWar, US CivilWars, US Indian
 
Fort Scott Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, October 4, 2014
4. Fort Scott Marker
Fort Scott Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, October 4, 2014
5. Fort Scott Marker
Fort Scott image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, October 4, 2014
6. Fort Scott
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 27, 2009, by Thomas Onions of Olathe, Kansas. This page has been viewed 1,561 times since then and 41 times this year. Last updated on November 10, 2014, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. Photos:   1. submitted on March 25, 2016, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   2, 3. submitted on June 27, 2009, by Thomas Onions of Olathe, Kansas.   4, 5, 6. submitted on November 10, 2014, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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