Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Pittsburgh in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

History of Observatory Hill

 
 
History of Observatory Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, December 14, 2014
1. History of Observatory Hill Marker
Panel 1
1907
Inscription. Observatory Hill was originall part of Allegheny City. Since Allegheny City's annexation to the City of Pittsburgh in 1907, the Observatory Hill district has expanded and is home to nearly 14,000 residents. The neighborhood features stately homes, a business district, Riverview Park and the Allegheny Observatory.
 
Erected by Pipitone Group.
 
Location. 40° 29.423′ N, 80° 1.132′ W. Marker is in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in Allegheny County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Perrysville Avenue (U.S. 19) and Franklin Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. These displays are combined on multiple businesses. Marker is in this post office area: Pittsburgh PA 15214, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Riverview United Presbyterian Church (approx. half a mile away); Allegheny Observatory (approx. half a mile away); First Aluminum Observatory Dome (approx. 0.7 miles away); Saint Boniface Roman Catholic Church (approx. 1.9 miles away); Mount Assisi (approx. 2 miles away); McKees Rocks Mound
History of Observatory Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, December 14, 2014
2. History of Observatory Hill Marker
Panel 2
Center photo: Samuel Pierpont Langley
(approx. 2.1 miles away); Martha Graham (approx. 2.1 miles away); West View Memorial (approx. 2.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Pittsburgh.
 
Also see . . .
1. Samuel Pierpont Langley at FindAGrave.com. (Submitted on December 17, 2014, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.)
2. John Alford Brashear at FindAGrave.com. (Submitted on December 17, 2014, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.)
3. Matthew Calbraith Perry at FindAGrave.com. (Submitted on December 17, 2014, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.)
4. Oliver Hazard Perry at FindAGrave.com. (Submitted on December 17, 2014, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.)
5. Art Blakey at FindAGrave.com. (Submitted on December 17, 2014, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.)
6. Earl Kenneth "Fatha" Hines at FindAGrave.com. (Submitted on December 17, 2014, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.)
7. Kenny Clarke at FindAGrave.com. (Submitted on December 17, 2014, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.)
8. Roy "Little Jazz" Eldridge at FindAGrave.com. (Submitted on December 17, 2014, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.)
9. Billy "Mr. B" Eckstine at FindAGrave.com. (Submitted on December 17, 2014, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.)
10. Harriet Tubman at FindAGrave.com. (Submitted on December 17, 2014, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.)
11. Observatory Hill Incorporated. (Submitted on December 17, 2014, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.)
12. Allegheny Observatory History. (Submitted on December 17, 2014, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRAfrican AmericansAir & SpaceWar of 1812
 
History of Observatory Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, December 14, 2014
3. History of Observatory Hill Marker
Panel 3
Observatory Hill
History of Observatory Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, December 14, 2014
4. History of Observatory Hill Marker
Panel 4
Top photo: John A. Brashear
History of Observatory Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, December 14, 2014
5. History of Observatory Hill Marker
Panel 5
Photos of the Allegheny Observatory
History of Observatory Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, December 14, 2014
6. History of Observatory Hill Marker
Panel 6
The observatory was founded on February 15, 1859, in the city of Allegheny, Pennsylvania (incorporated into the city of Pittsburgh in 1907) by a group of wealthy industrialists calling themselves the Allegheny Telescope Association. The observatory's initial purpose was for the entertainment of the Association's members as opposed to research, but in 1867 membership had waned. The facility was then donated to the Western University of Pennsylvania, today know as the University of Pittsburgh.
History of Observatory Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, December 14, 2014
7. History of Observatory Hill Marker
Panel 7
Perrysville Avenue
Top photo: Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry
At the time of its settlement, Perrysville Avenue was a part of the Venango Trail, an Indian path leading north from 'Allegheny Town.' Commodore Perry used the trail to carry supplies from Pittsburgh to Erie for his lake battle against the British during the War of 1812. Known as Franklin Road during the early part of the 19th century, the roadway was used, after 1828, for the transport of cargo north from the Pennsylvania Canal. A private corporation rebuilt the road at this time, covering it with planks to lessen dust and mud. Tolls were then imposed on users of the Perrysville Plank Road.

We have met the enemy and they are ours. Two ships, two brigs, one schooner and one sloop.
Yours, with great respect and esteem,
O.H. Perry
History of Observatory Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, December 14, 2014
8. History of Observatory Hill Marker
Panel 8
Perrysville Avenue
History of Observatory Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, December 14, 2014
9. History of Observatory Hill Marker
Panel 9
Venango Trail
Venango Path was a Native American trail that ran from the Forks of the Ohio (present day Pittsburgh) to Presque Isle, Pennsylvania. The trail was named after the Native American village of Venango, where French Creek empties into the Allegheny River. The village is now the site of the small city of Franklin, Pennsylvania.
History of Observatory Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, December 14, 2014
10. History of Observatory Hill Marker
Panel 10
Notable African American musicians from the Pittsburgh area:
Art Blakey (1919-1990)
Eddie Jefferson (1918-1979)
Earl Hines (1903-1983)
History of Observatory Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, December 14, 2014
11. History of Observatory Hill Marker
Panel 11
Notable African American musicians from the Pittsburgh area:
Kenny Clarke (1914-1985)
Roy Eldridge (1911-1989)
Billy Eckstine (1914)
History of Observatory Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, December 14, 2014
12. History of Observatory Hill Marker
Panel 12
Harriet Tubman
Harriet Tubman
Activist
Harriet Tubman was an African-American abolishonist, humanitarian and Union spy during the American Civil War.

Born: c. 1822, Dorchester County, MD
Died: March 10, 1913, Auburn, NY


"Every dream begins with a dreamer. Always remember, you have within you the strength, the patience, and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world."


Historians say the Felix Brunot mansion on Stockton Avenue was once a station on the underground railway, where fugitive slaves from the South stopped for food and shelter.
History of Observatory Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, December 14, 2014
13. History of Observatory Hill Marker
Panel 13
Harriet Tubman
"I freed a thousand slaves. I could have freed a thousand more if only they knew they were slaves."
History of Observatory Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, December 14, 2014
14. History of Observatory Hill Marker
Multiple displays as noted above
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 17, 2014, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 316 times since then and 51 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. submitted on December 17, 2014, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
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