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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Greeneville in Greene County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Dickson - Williams Mansion

 
 
Dickson - Willians Mansion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 27, 2009
1. Dickson - Willians Mansion Marker
Inscription. Designed and constructed (1815-21) by Irish craftsmen Thomas Battersby and John Hoy, this house was built by Greeneville's first postmaster, William Dickson, for his daughter, Catharine (Mrs.Alexander Williams). Marquis de LaFayette, Presidents Jackson and Polk, Henry Clay, David Crockett, and Frances Hodgsen Burnett were visitors. It served as headquarters for both Confederate and Union officers. Confederate General John Hunt Morgan spent his last night here before being killed in the garden on September 4, 1864.
 
Erected by Tennessee Historical Commission. (Marker Number 1C 76.)
 
Location. 36° 9.887′ N, 82° 49.93′ W. Marker is in Greeneville, Tennessee, in Greene County. Marker is on West Church Street, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 193 West Church Street, Greeneville TN 37743, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named The Dickson - Williams Mansion (within shouting distance of this marker); Death of Gen. John Hunt Morgan (within shouting distance of this marker); General Morgan Inn (within shouting distance of this marker);
Dickson - Willians Mansion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 27, 2009
2. Dickson - Willians Mansion Marker
Death of John Morgan (within shouting distance of this marker); Opera House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); James H. Quillen United States Courthouse (about 400 feet away); Greenville Cumberland Presbyterian Church (about 500 feet away); Greeneville Cumberland Presbyterian Church (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Greeneville.
 
Also see . . .  Historic American Buildings Survey record for the Dickson-Williams Mansion. Significance: In converting this early nineteenth century building into a hospital, much of the original structure has been concealed. Many famous people were entertained here, including Presidents Andrew Jackson and James K. Polk. (Submitted on August 23, 2015.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
Dickson - Willians Mansion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 27, 2009
3. Dickson - Willians Mansion Marker
Dickson - Williams Mansion image. Click for full size.
By Lisa Barnett, August 23, 2014
4. Dickson - Williams Mansion
Dickson - Williams Mansion image. Click for full size.
Photo Courtesy of the Historic American Buildings Survey, circa 1890
5. Dickson - Williams Mansion
Full title is: Copy Negative By Ray Moody, Photographer January 22, 1958 OLD PHOTOGRAPH OWNED BY RICHARD H. DOUGHTY CONDITION LATE 19TH CENTURY. - Dickson-Williams Mansion, North Irish & West Church Streets, Greeneville, Greene County, TN
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 7, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,158 times since then and 80 times this year. Last updated on March 17, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 7, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   4. submitted on August 23, 2014, by Lisa Barnett of Jonesborough, Tennessee.   5. submitted on August 23, 2015. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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