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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Mitchell in Russell County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

James Cantey

 
 
James Cantey Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, December 28, 2009
1. James Cantey Marker
Inscription. Near here was the home of Confederate Brigadier General James Cantey who arrived in 1849 to operate a plantation owned by his father. Prior to coming to Russell County he had practiced law at his birthplace, Camden, South Carolina, and had represented his district in the State Legislature there for two terms. Cantey fought in the Mexican War and received near mortal wounds. He was left among the dead but was rescued by his body servant whose plans were to bear him home for burial. The slave's detection of a faint sign of life caused heroic action that revived his master. For this deed the servant was offered his freedom which was refused.

(Reverse):
General Cantey was married in 1858 at Fort Mitchell to Mary Elizabeth Benton, niece of Colonel John Crowell, Alabama's first Congressman. At the beginning of the War Between The States he organized "Cantey's Rifles" in what was then the 15th Alabama Regiment. He served throughout the war and surrendered with Joseph E. Johnston at Durham Station, North Carolina, April 26, 1865. The first Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy in Russell County, organized at Seale, was named in his honor. General Cantey was born December 30, 1818, and died June 30, 1874. He is interred in a family cemetery at Fort Mitchell.
 
Erected
James Cantey Marker Reverse Side image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, December 28, 2009
2. James Cantey Marker Reverse Side
1980 by The Historic Chattahoochee Commission / The Russell County Historical Commission.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the United Daughters of the Confederacy marker series.
 
Location. 32° 20.82′ N, 85° 1.146′ W. Marker is in Fort Mitchell, Alabama, in Russell County. Marker can be reached from U.S. 165. Touch for map. This marker is located on the grounds of the Fort Mitchell Historic Landmark Park, about half-mile from the main entrance on the road to the site of the fort on the left in front of the Cantey Cemetery. Marker is at or near this postal address: 561 Highway 165, Fort Mitchell AL 36856, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. John Crowell (here, next to this marker); Asbury School and Mission (here, next to this marker); Fort Mitchell Military Cemetery (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fort Mitchell (about 600 feet away); The Creeks Today (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Creek Trail of Tears (approx. 0.2 miles away); Removal of the Creeks (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Creek Nation / The Chattahoochee Indian Heritage Center (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Mitchell.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. Battle of Cross
James Cantey Marker In The Center (Cantey Cemetery) image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, December 28, 2009
3. James Cantey Marker In The Center (Cantey Cemetery)
Keys where Cantey's 15th Alabama fought.
 
Also see . . .  More About James Cantey With Image. (Submitted on January 1, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, Mexican-AmericanWar, US Civil
 
James Cantey Gravesite image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, December 28, 2009
4. James Cantey Gravesite
Cantey Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, December 28, 2009
5. Cantey Cemetery
James Cantey image. Click for full size.
circa 1846
6. James Cantey
Courtesy Library of Congress.
Brig. Gen. Cantey, C.S.A. Horse Mounting Stone image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, December 28, 2009
7. Brig. Gen. Cantey, C.S.A. Horse Mounting Stone
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 1, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 2,558 times since then and 124 times this year. Last updated on March 19, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on January 1, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.   6. submitted on March 19, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   7. submitted on January 1, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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