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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Retreat

 
 
Retreat Marker image. Click for full size.
By Shawn Oliver, April 2, 2015
1. Retreat Marker
Inscription. At about 5:00 p.m. on July 9, 1864, the Confederates stormed the Union line on the Georgetown Pike. Union General Wallace ordered the withdrawal and chaos soon followed. With Confederates in hot pursuit, Union troops fled past Gambrill Mill, then through the field in front of you, and across Bush Creek behind you. After two miles the Confederates finally abandoned their chase.

The lines were thrown into great confusion. The advancing Confederates who, in great numbers, are bearing down upon us.
Private Alfred Roe, 9th New York Heavy Artillery

(captions)
(lower left) Brigadier General James B. Ricketts, commanded the Union defense at the Thomas Farm until ordered to retreat.
(lower center) Major General John B. Gordon commanded the Confederate division that defeated the Union forces.
(lower right) During the retreat, the color guards from the 10th Vermont Infantry were under heavy fire and unable to continue. Corporal Alexander Scott, fearing the union flags might be captured, ran both flags to safety. For his valor in saving the national flag he received the Medal of Honor on September 21, 1897.
 
Erected by Monocacy National Battlefield—National Park Service—U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Marker series.
Retreat Marker looking toward the Gambrill Mill House image. Click for full size.
By Shawn Oliver
2. Retreat Marker looking toward the Gambrill Mill House
This marker is included in the Medal of Honor Recipients marker series.
 
Location. 39° 22.123′ N, 77° 23.136′ W. Marker is in Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Urbana Pike (Maryland Route 355) and Araby Church Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. This marker is located along the 0.5-mile Gambrill Mill Trail, located at Stop 5 on the Auto-Tour route. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4823 Urbana Pike, Frederick MD 21704, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Gambrill House (was about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line but has been reported missing. ); Monocacy Battlefield (about 700 feet away); A Bold Plan (about 700 feet away); Monocacy National Battlefield (about 700 feet away); a different marker also named Monocacy National Battlefield (about 700 feet away); Gambrill Mill (about 700 feet away); Edgewood (about 800 feet away); Burning of the Bridge (was about 800 feet away but has been reported missing. ). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frederick.
 
Also see . . .
1. Old Marker at this Location. This marker replaced an older one at this location titled “Brush Creek Crossing” (Submitted on April 3, 2015.) 

2. Monocacy National Battlefield
Bush Creek image. Click for full size.
By Shawn Oliver, April 2, 2015
3. Bush Creek
. National Park Service (Submitted on April 3, 2015.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Corporal Alexander Scott rescues the flags. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 1, 2017
4. Corporal Alexander Scott rescues the flags.
During the retreat, the color guards from the 10th Vermont Infantry were under heavy fire and unable to continue. Corporal Alexander Scott, fearing the union flags might be captured, ran both flags to safety. For his valor in saving the national flag he received the Medal of Honor on September 21, 1897.
Close-up of image on marker
Corporal Alexander Scott, of Co. D, 10th Vermont Volunteers image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 1, 2017
5. Corporal Alexander Scott, of Co. D, 10th Vermont Volunteers
”at Monocacy July 9, 1864 this soldier, a corporal in Co. D, 10th Vermont Volunteers and carrying the State Flag while his regiment was withdrawing under very heavy fire of the enemy saw the color sergeant bearing the national colors fall out of line exhausted and drop to the rear which meant inevitable capture. Corporal Scott then nearly overpowered by the heat and fatigue picked up the national flag and carried both colors during the remainder of the action.” — Medal of Honor Citation.
Close-up of photo on marker
Scott's Headstone at Arlington National Cemetery image. Click for full size.
Tim1965 - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0 - Wikipedia, September 11, 2011
6. Scott's Headstone at Arlington National Cemetery

Alexander Scott,
Medal of Honor
Cpl Co D
10 VT Inf
1844
1923
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 1, 2017. This page originally submitted on April 3, 2015, by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia. This page has been viewed 318 times since then and 74 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 3, 2015, by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia.   4, 5, 6. submitted on June 1, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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