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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Fort Hill in Somerset County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Mt. Davis

A Geological Feature

 
 
Mt. Davis Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, August 7, 2007
1. Mt. Davis Marker
Inscription. Mt. Davis 3213 feet above sea leavel is the highest point in Pennsylvania. The erosion-resistant sandstone at the surface belongs to the Pottsville group formed about 230 million years ago. These layers of sedimentary rock were pushed up as an upfold 200 million years ago during the upheaval called the Appalachian Revolution.
 
Location. 39° 47.156′ N, 79° 10.626′ W. Marker is near Fort Hill, Pennsylvania, in Somerset County. Marker can be reached from S. Wolf Rock Road 0.6 miles south of Mt. Davis Road when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is accessible from footpath that is about 300 feet from the parking lot for Mt. Davis. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Hill PA 15540, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. John Nelson Davis (within shouting distance of this marker); T/Sgt. Melvin F. Wooten (approx. 5.1 miles away); Negro Mountain (approx. 5.8 miles away in Maryland); The Fuller-Baker House (approx. 6.2 miles away in Maryland); General Braddock’s 5th Camp (approx. 6.3 miles away in Maryland); Grantsville
Mt. Davis Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, August 7, 2007
2. Mt. Davis Marker
This marker is near the intersection of Mt. Davis and S. Wolf Rock roads.
(approx. 6.3 miles away in Maryland); Leo J. Beachy (approx. 6.3 miles away in Maryland); Traveling the National Road (approx. 6.4 miles away in Maryland).
 
Categories. Natural Features
 
Mt. Davis Tower image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, August 7, 2007
3. Mt. Davis Tower
Tower located about 100 feet from the marker, at the highest point in Pennsylvania.
View from Tower image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, May 9, 2008
4. View from Tower
Looking southeast towards Salisbury, PA.
Mt. Davis Markers image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, May 9, 2008
5. Mt. Davis Markers
Cluster of markers located about 100 feet from the tower structure.
Industry Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, May 9, 2008
6. Industry Marker
Inscription: Logging on a large scale began in 1879. The following firms have cut timber on Negro Mountain: Pinkerton; markleton; J.R. Droney; McSpadden; Cook & Sechler; Cook & Duncan; Maust; Whites Creek and Muncy Lumber Co's.. The last to shut down and leave the mountain was the Muncy, in 1923. A number of logging and mining railroads crisscrossed the slopes. Deposits of coal and limestone were found shortly before 1800. A gristmill operated on Tub Mill Run from 1872 until 1940. A brick and tile industry was born when suitable clay was discovered on the mountain.
Tar Kiln Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, May 9, 2008
7. Tar Kiln Marker
The last kiln on Negro Mountain was abandoned about 1835. Kilns were used to extract Pine Tar from Pitch Pine. Dished stones similar to the one found just off South Wolf Rock Road, were the bases of tar kilns. Pitchy sections of resinous pine, including knots and cones, were stacked on these stones, then covered with earth and wet leaves. The stack was ignited. The heat caused the pitch to ooze out of th epine onto the stone and run off along the collecting groove to where it was gathered.
Wild Child and Baughman Rocks Markers image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, May 9, 2008
8. Wild Child and Baughman Rocks Markers
The Wild Child inscription: In the late spring or early summer of 1830, a ten year old girl, Lydia Shultz, was living with her family on the slopes of Negro Mountain. Lydia was sent to the woods, as was the custom, to gather the cows. When she didn't return, neighbors went searching for the child. Months went by until she was eventually found. She had been living off the land, eating berries and other foods nature provides. The child had become quite wild, at times hiding from the searchers.

Baughman Rocks inscription: Henry Baughman - an ill-tempered man - and his two sons, were searching the fields for lost cows. The father becaome angry with his youngest son, August, who was slowing the search. The father struck him with a stick, knocking him unconscious. Henry, thinking his son was dead, hid the body amongst what is now called BAUGHMAN ROCKS. Later, returning to the site, he could not find the body. On the testimony of his eldest son, Henry was tried, convicted, and served a term for second-degree murder. What happened to August remains a myster to this day.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 8, 2008, by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,711 times since then and 68 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on June 8, 2008, by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland.
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