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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Commemoration

 
 
Commemoration Marker image. Click for full size.
By Shawn Oliver, April 2, 2015
1. Commemoration Marker
Inscription. On July 9, 1907, 43 years after the battle of Monocacy, 180 veterans of the 14th New Jersey Regiment returned to dedicate this monument in honor of their comrades and their sacrifices. Most of the men wore a memorial pin on their lapel, given to them the morning of the ceremony. It was a joyous, yet somber occasion—joyous to be reunited with old friends, yet somber because more than 140 members of the regiment had been wounded, captured, or killed at Monocacy. After the Civil War, many states built monuments like this one to commemorate the sacrifices of their fallen sons; a small gesture, but appreciated by those who served.

It will be...a lesson in patriotism to this and future generations, and remind all who may look upon it that New Jersey's sons did well their duty on this field in the great struggle for a United Nation.
Rev. Dr. W.W. Case, excerpt from his monument dedication speech, July 9, 1907

(captions)
(lower left) The State of New Jersey placed the first monument on the battlefield. Other monuments were later added: Pennsylvania (1908), United Daughters of the Confederacy (1914), Vermont (1915), and Maryland (1964).
(lower right) At the dedication ceremony former members of the 14th New Jersey Regiment—known as the Monocacy Regiment—were presented this commemorative
View of the 14th New Jersey Infantry Regiment monument from the Commemoration Marker image. Click for full size.
By Shawn Oliver, April 2, 2015
2. View of the 14th New Jersey Infantry Regiment monument from the Commemoration Marker
pin. The regiment was assigned to Monocacy Junction from September 1862 to June 1863, returning during the Gettysburg Campaign and once more in 1864 to fight.
 
Erected by Monocacy National Battlefield—National Park Service—U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 39° 22.251′ N, 77° 23.537′ W. Marker is in Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is on Urbana Pike (Maryland Route 355) 0.4 miles north of Araby Church Road, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. This marker is located at the parking lot next to the 14th New Jersey Monument, stop 2 on the Auto-tour route. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5148-5156 Urbana Pike, Frederick MD 21703, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 14th New Jersey Infantry Regiment (within shouting distance of this marker); Nick of Time (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Slave to Soldier (about 400 feet away); Desperate Escape (approx. mile away); Burning the Bridge (approx. mile away); Burning of the Bridge (was approx. mile away but has been reported missing. ); L'Hermitage (approx. 0.3 miles away); Caught in the Crossfire (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frederick.
 
Also see . . .
14th New Jersey Infantry Regiment Monument image. Click for full size.
By Shawn Oliver, April 2, 2015
3. 14th New Jersey Infantry Regiment Monument

1. Monocacy National Battlefield. National Park Service (Submitted on April 9, 2015.) 

2. Old Marker at this Location. This marker replaced an older one at this location titled “Federals Take A Stand". (Submitted on April 9, 2015.) 
 
Categories. MilitaryWar, US Civil
 
Commemoration Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 8, 2015
4. Commemoration Marker
Commemorative Pin image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 8, 2015
5. Commemorative Pin
At the dedication ceremony former members of the 14th New Jersey Regiment—known as the Monocacy Regiment—were presented this commemorative pin. The regiment was assigned to Monocacy Junction from September 1862 to June 1863, returning during the Gettysburg Campaign and once more in 1864 to fight.
Close-up of photo on marker
NJ Monument image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 8, 2015
6. NJ Monument
1907 Statue by Robert Aitken
Close-up of photo on marker
14th New Jersey Monument image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 8, 2015
7. 14th New Jersey Monument
New Jersey Monument image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 8, 2015
8. New Jersey Monument
Tour Stop 2
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 8, 2015, by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia. This page has been viewed 285 times since then and 54 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 8, 2015, by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia.   4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on November 11, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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