Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Ocotillo in Imperial County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Jay C. von Werlhof

 
 
Jay C. von Werlhof Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, March 31, 2015
1. Jay C. von Werlhof Marker
Inscription. The Imperial Valley College Desert Museum represents the creative vision of noted archaeologist and anthropologist Jay Crawford von Werlhof (1923-2009)

A prolific author, von Werlhof wrote many scholarly books and articles on the archaeology and history of the Indigenous people of the California desert regions. Throughout his 55-year career, he conducted archaeological research in each of California's 58 counties. After relocating to the Imperial Valley in 1973, von Werlhof documented more than 10,000 archaeological sites within Imperial county. These sites included geoglyphs, rock art, lithics and trails never before acknowledged. A gifted artist, he illustrated numerous archaeological site records and articles, many of which are on file at his alma mater, the University of California at Berkeley.

While serving on the faculty of Imperial Valley College, von Werlhof conceived of and worked to establish a museum to display and interpret the archaeology and prehistory of the region. First housed in downtown El Centro and known as the Baker Museum, the museum building was heavily damaged during a earthquake what struck the southern Imperial valley in October 1979.

A series of fund-raising efforts launched in 1992 culminated in the construction of the current 10,000 square-foot facility designed to preserve
Jay C. von Werlhof Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, March 31, 2015
2. Jay C. von Werlhof Marker
and display the various collections gathered over the years. The museum is also meant to serve as an educational locale, introducing visitors to the wealth of archaeological materials discovered in the Imperial Valley. Many businesses, public agencies, service clubs, Native American tribes and generous individuals joined to help make von Werlhof's vision reach fruition.
 
Erected 2010 by Placed in cooperation with the Imperial Valley Desert Museum Society by the Ancient and Honorable Order of E Clampus Vitus John P. Squibob Chapter #1853.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the E Clampus Vitus marker series.
 
Location. 32° 43.896′ N, 115° 59.973′ W. Marker is near Ocotillo, California, in Imperial County. Marker can be reached from Frontage Road. Touch for map. Marker is at the entrance to the Imperial Valley Desert Museum. Access is from I-8 at exit 89. Marker is at or near this postal address: 11 Frontage Road, Ocotillo CA 92259, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 4 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. De Anza Overlook (approx. 6.2 miles away); Yuha Well (approx. 7.2 miles away); Mountain Springs Station Site (approx. 7.7 miles away); Desert Tower (approx. 7.7 miles away).
 
Categories. AnthropologyNative Americans
 
Jay C. von Werlhof Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, March 31, 2015
3. Jay C. von Werlhof Marker
Imperial Valley Desert Museum image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, March 31, 2015
4. Imperial Valley Desert Museum
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 17, 2015, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 274 times since then and 46 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 17, 2015, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement