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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Chickamauga in Catoosa County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Henderson Plantation

Chickamauga Campaign Heritage Trail

 
 
Henderson Plantation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 19, 2014
1. Henderson Plantation Marker
Inscription. John S. Henderson, the son of a Scottish immigrant, came to the local area from Tennessee with his brother William and an African slave woman named Millie. He bought land that included the old farm of Jesse Lane, where the stage stopped, another property property that was called the Hawkins place, the Dr. A. Q. Simmons place, and 180 acres of woodlands that made a total of 720 acres. His house was situated on the east side of the LaFayette Road with cedar trees in the yard. He also brought boxwood from his home in Tennessee.

At the time of the 1860 census, John S. Henderson was 52 years old, and had 12,800.00 in real estate and $12, 385.00 in personal assets. Along with his 42 year-old wife, John Henderson's household consisted of five sons and a daughter. Two of the older sons were eager to join the Confederate Army at the start of the war. "Uncle Jerome was at Penfield College (now Mercer University)," J. Frank Henderson, the grandson of John Henderson, wrote. "He came home in June [of 1861] ... and ... organized a company at Crawfish Spring, and since they could not get in a Georgia regiment at that time, they joined the 26th Tennessee Infantry where they served until Uncle Jerome was captured at Fort Donaldson [Donelson], Tennessee. Uncle Jerome died in prison soon after capture at Camp Douglas, Illinois. Uncle John joined
Henderson Plantation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 19, 2014
2. Henderson Plantation Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of Sergeant Jerome Henderson.
Joe Wheeler's Cavalry, Colonel Avery's Regiment Fourth Cavalry. Uncle John served throughout the war in Wheeler's Cavalry. One of his comrades told me that Uncle John made a fine soldier and he stuck with them until the end."

In the spring of 1863, when the opposing armies drew closer, Henderson felt that it was time to hide his gold. He trusted his slave woman Millie more than anyone else in his household. "He took Aunt Millie and went over in the woods east of the house," his grandson J. Frank Henderson later wrote, "and buried a lot of gold."

On September 18, 1863, Confederate General Thomas Hindman's Division moved up the LaFayette Road to the Henderson plantation. General Leonidas Polk, the corps commander, was also present, and established his headquarters in the Henderson house. To enable General Polk to communicate with the rest of the army, a courier station was also established. After a brief artillery duel with the Federals at Lee and Gordon's Mills they camped on the grounds. The next day they crossed the creek to take part in the main battle. Following the Battle of Chickamauga, a Confederate hospital was established at the Henderson house.

"Aunt Gussie said that the Yankee officers would stand out in the front yard," Frank Henderson later stated, "and admire the view of Lookout Mountain. They thought the scene was beautiful. The Yankees
Henderson Plantation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 19, 2014
3. Henderson Plantation Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of a map made by Colonel William E. Merrill, Chief Engineer of the Army of the Cumberland, that shows the location of the Henderson Plantation.
never mistreated Grandma in anyway or any of her children or Aunt Millie." After the war, John Henderson returned and used the money that his slave woman Millie had kept safe for him to rebuild the plantation.

Please visit our website at:
http://www.ChickamaugaCampaign.org

 
Erected by Chickamauga Campaign Heritage Trail.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Chickamauga Campaign Heritage Trail marker series.
 
Location. 34° 51.755′ N, 85° 15.48′ W. Marker is near Chickamauga, Georgia, in Catoosa County. Marker is on Farming Rock Road (County Route 145) south of Lafayette Highway (U.S. 27), on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. This marker is located on a rural country road, on the east side of the roadway, about midway between the intersection of the LaFayette Highway and the intersection of Lee Clarkson Road. Marker is in this post office area: Chickamauga GA 30707, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Clarissa Hunt Plantation (approx. 0.6 miles away); Glass's Mill Battle Site (approx. 1.1 miles away); a different marker also named Glass's Mill Battle Site (approx. 1.1 miles
Henderson Plantation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 19, 2014
4. Henderson Plantation Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of the Henderson House.
away); Lee and Gordon's Mill (approx. 1 miles away); Crittenden's corps at Lee and Gordon's Mills (approx. 1 miles away); General Joe Wheeler's Attack (approx. 1 miles away); Start of the Atlanta Campaign (approx. 1 miles away); 2nd Georgia Cavalry (approx. 1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Chickamauga.
 
Categories. Settlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
Henderson Plantation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 19, 2014
5. Henderson Plantation Marker
Henderson Plantation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 19, 2014
6. Henderson Plantation Marker
View of the marker in the midst of the cedar trees mentioned in the text of the marker.
Henderson Plantation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 19, 2014
7. Henderson Plantation Marker
View of the marker and of the nearby grounds, which probably include a view of where the Henderson House once stood.
Henderson Plantation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 19, 2014
8. Henderson Plantation Marker
View of the marker looking north along the roadway (in the direction of the LaFayette Highway).
Henderson Plantation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 19, 2014
9. Henderson Plantation Marker
View of the marker looking south along the roadway.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 1, 2015, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 426 times since then and 73 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on May 2, 2015, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.
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