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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Tishomingo in Tishomingo County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

Cave Spring

 
 
Cave Spring Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 4, 2015
1. Cave Spring Marker
Inscription. The description of the ground surface and the type of rock indicate that this cave was a result of solution activity. A long room or corridor was dissolved out of the rock by under-ground water. The roof of the room eventually weakened and collapsed. Indians may have used this site as a source of water and stone. The water is now unsafe to drink and the cave is dangerous.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Natchez Trace marker series.
 
Location. 34° 38.583′ N, 88° 8.436′ W. Marker is near Tishomingo, Mississippi, in Tishomingo County. Marker can be reached from Natchez Trace Parkway (at milepost 308.4), 0.8 miles north of Mississippi Highway 30, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Tishomingo MS 38873, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Bear Creek Mound (approx. half a mile away); The Natchez Trace (approx. 3 miles away); a different marker also named Natchez Trace (approx. 5.2 miles away); Mac McAnally (approx. 10 miles away); Levi Colbert Stand
Cave Spring Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 4, 2015
2. Cave Spring Marker
Beginning of sidewalk to sinkhole and cave
(approx. 10.5 miles away in Alabama); Battle of Iuka (approx. 11.3 miles away); The 11th Ohio Battery (approx. 11.3 miles away); Brig. Gen. Henry Little (approx. 11.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tishomingo.
 
Also see . . .  Natchez Trace. Official National Park Service website. (Submitted on June 26, 2015.) 
 
Categories. EnvironmentNative Americans
 
Overlook of Sink Hole image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 4, 2015
3. Overlook of Sink Hole
Sink Hole image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 4, 2015
4. Sink Hole
A SINK HOLE is forming in the limestone which is the basic type of rock in this area. Carbon dioxide absorbed by rain-water as it falls forms a weak acid which dissolves the limestone as the water seeps along tissues and cracks. These fissures are gradually enlarged until the surface materials, topsoil, and leaf litter begin to slump into it.
In the Sink Hole image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 4, 2015
5. In the Sink Hole
The Cave of Cave Spring image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 4, 2015
6. The Cave of Cave Spring
At the north end of the sink hole
View Toward the Natchez Trace Parkway image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 4, 2015
7. View Toward the Natchez Trace Parkway
Cave Spring image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 4, 2015
8. Cave Spring
View to northwest from Natchez Trace Parkway
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 26, 2015, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 247 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on June 26, 2015, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.
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