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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Dauphin in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

United States Slavery

 
 
United States Slavery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 6, 2015
1. United States Slavery Marker
Inscription. At the birth of the United States in the 1770s, slavery was firmly embedded in its fabric. Blacks stolen from Africa were shipped to America as part of a lucrative trade system. Most enslaved people lived in the South, but about 10% lived in the North. By 1810 the population of free Blacks in the North had risen greatly because of the spread of abolitionist ideology.

After 1810 the use of the cotton gin made cotton a lucrative Southern crop. This dramatically increased the need for enslaved labor. By the time of the Civil War in the 1860s, slavery had polarized the nation into free and slave states. The struggle over slavery, especially its expansion into more western territories, was the fuel that ignited the Civil War. By its outbreak in 1861, 4,000,000 enslaved people toiled in the United States. The Proclamation of Emancipation, issued by Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863, played a key role in ending slavery nationwide.

(Inscription under the image in the center left)
Proclamation of Emancipation transcript

(Inscription beside the image in the lower left)
This is an example of what slave quarters would have looked like, basic with no major luxuries.

(Inscription under the image in the upper right)
This was what a typical ship looked like that was used in the slave trade during the 18th century.

(Inscription

United States Slavery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 6, 2015
2. United States Slavery Marker
under the image in the lower right)
Slave distribution according to the 1860 census.
 
Erected by Dauphin County.
 
Location. 40° 20.505′ N, 76° 54.575′ W. Marker is in Dauphin, Pennsylvania, in Dauphin County. Marker is on River Road. Touch for map. The marker is located on the grounds of Fort Hunter Park. Marker is in this post office area: Dauphin PA 17018, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Pennsylvania Slavery (here, next to this marker); Slavery at Fort Hunter (here, next to this marker); Fort Hunter History (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Hunter (within shouting distance of this marker); Simon Girty (within shouting distance of this marker); Rockville Bridge (approx. mile away); Village of Heckton (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named Rockville Bridge (approx. 1.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Dauphin.
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRAfrican AmericansColonial EraIndustry & Commerce
 
Sign at the entrance to Fort Hunter Park image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 6, 2015
3. Sign at the entrance to Fort Hunter Park
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 23, 2015, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 135 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 23, 2015, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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