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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Uriah in Monroe County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Creek Indian Removal

 
 
Creek Indian Removal Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 25, 2015
1. Creek Indian Removal Marker
Inscription. Little River was the home of Creek Chief William Weatherford, also known as War Chief Red Eagle. This was the area of much discussion and debate, bringing the Creeks into the War of 1812 and the Creek Civil War of 1813-1814. These events weighed heavily in the land forfeiture in the Treaty of Fort Jackson (Toulouse) in 1814. Weatherford surrendered to Andrew Jackson, ceding away the largest single tract of land in Alabama. This treaty set the stage for the forced Creek removal (Trail of Tears) of the 1830s. Alabama remains the home of many Creek Indians today, including the Poarch Band of Creek Indian reservation in Escambia County.
 
Erected 1998 by the Alabama Indian Affairs Commission and the Alabama Forestry Commission.
 
Location. 31° 15.588′ N, 87° 29.616′ W. Marker is near Uriah, Alabama, in Monroe County. Marker is at the intersection of Alabama Route 21 at milepost 19 and H-Kyle Road, on the right when traveling north on State Route 21. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 580 H-Kyle Road, Uriah AL 36480, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 18 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Uriah Veterans Memorial (approx. 3.2 miles away); Old Federal Road
Little River State Park & Forest behind marker. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 25, 2015
2. Little River State Park & Forest behind marker.
(approx. 3.9 miles away); a different marker also named Old Federal Road (approx. 8 miles away); Frisco City Centennial Time Capsule (approx. 13 miles away); Frisco City Town Park (approx. 13 miles away); The Canoe Fight (approx. 15.6 miles away); French's Chapel (approx. 16 miles away); Gainestown (approx. 17˝ miles away).
 
Regarding Creek Indian Removal. “The Treaty of Fort Jackson,” which is also known as the “1814 Treaty with the Creeks.” This treaty was signed near Wetumpka on Aug. 9, 1814 after the Battle of Horseshoe Bend. In addition to Andrew Jackson and William Weatherford, other men who signed the treaty include William McIntosh Jr., Folappo Haujo of the Eufaulau Indians, John O'Kelly of the Coosa Indians, Eneah Thlucco Hopoiee of the Talesee Indians and Tuskegee Emautla of the Tuskegee Indians.

“The Trail of Tears” came about mostly due to the Indian Removal Act of 1830, which was passed into law on May 28, 1830 during Andrew Jackson’s presidency. Not all Indians were removed from Alabama, however, as evidenced by the presence of the Poarch Creek Indians and their
Nearby park entrance sign. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 25, 2015
3. Nearby park entrance sign.
reservation near Atmore.
 
Also see . . .  The Creek War of 1813-1814 in AL, GA & FL. (Submitted on July 27, 2015, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Native AmericansWars, US Indian
 
View of marker looking south on AL-21. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 25, 2015
4. View of marker looking south on AL-21.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 26, 2015, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 278 times since then and 56 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 26, 2015, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.   2, 3, 4. submitted on July 27, 2015, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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