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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lakeside Marblehead in Ottawa County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Confederate Stockade Cemetery

 
 
Confederate Stockade Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 5, 2015
1. Confederate Stockade Cemetery Marker
Inscription.
Confederate Prison
On November 15, 1861, the War Department leased one half of Johnsonís Island, in Sandusky Bay, Ohio, and began constructing a 15-acre prison camp on the southeast shore. When complete, the prison complex included a 14-foot-tall board stockade that enclosed thirteen barracks, one of which served as a hospital. Each barracks had two external kitchens. Forty structures outside the complex housed prison staff. A redoubt with artillery looked down on the prison to guard against insurrection.

In June 1862, Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton ordered that all Confederate officers held at Camp Chase prison in Columbus, Ohio, be moved to Johnsonís Island. It became the official prison for Confederate officers; however, non-officers were held there, and officers were interned elsewhere.

Over the course of the war, about 12,000 prisoners were confined on Johnsonís Island. Compared to other Civil War prison facilities, a remarkably low number – 239 – died, despite the harsh climate and remote location. The first recorded death was David T. J. Wood on May 6, 1862; William Michael, who died in June 1865, the month the prison closed, was the last.

The Cemetery
Prisoners who died at Johnsonís Island were buried in a cemetery about a half mile from the prison. The soft, loamy island
Confederate Stockade Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 5, 2015
2. Confederate Stockade Cemetery Marker
soil made digging easy, but 4-5 feet below ground was solid bedrock, which prevented burials at customary levels of 6 feet. Each grave was marked with a wooden headboard.

After the war, friends or relatives removed more than twenty bodies. Marble headstones – 206 total – were erected in 1890 through the efforts of a group of Georgia journalists who visited the cemetery and reported in state newspapers the lack of permanent markers. Many of these headstones remain in place today.

Mary Patton Hudson
In 1905, the Robert Patton Chapter, United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC), bought the cemetery and adjacent lot from private owners. This purchase linked the cemetery and Mary Patton Hudson, the chapterís leader, for more than twenty years. Mrs. Hudson, known for her determination, worked diligently on behalf of the cemetery. After the Commission for Marking Graves of Confederate Dead was authorized in 1906, Mrs. Hudson immediately began lobbying for cemetery improvements including a new fence. Commissioner William Elliott declined to pay to enclose a cemetery the federal government did not own. Mrs. Hudson refused to relinquish the property.

To honor the soldiers buried on Johnsonís Island, Mrs. Hudson raised the money to erect a large monument in 1910 – a bronze statue of a Confederate soldier sculpted by Moses Ezekiel. Her crusade
Marker on Johnson's Island image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 5, 2015
3. Marker on Johnson's Island
to improve and beautify the cemetery continued until her death in 1920. In 1931, the UDC donated the cemetery to the U.S. government.
 
Erected by U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, National Cemetery Administration.
 
Location. 41° 30.045′ N, 82° 43.812′ W. Marker is in Lakeside Marblehead, Ohio, in Ottawa County. Marker is on Confederate Drive, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Lakeside Marblehead OH 43440, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Johnson's Island Prison (a few steps from this marker); The Lookout (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Johnson Island Monument (about 300 feet away); The Johnsonís Island Committee (about 300 feet away); Johnson's Island Civil War Prison (approx. 0.4 miles away); Johnson's Island (approx. one mile away); The Keeper's House (approx. 1.1 miles away); Home of Benajah Walcott (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lakeside Marblehead.
 
More about this marker. A photograph of “The redoubt at Johnsonís Island, c. 1863, Millerís Photographic History of the Civil War” appears on the left of the marker. Two photographs of the cemetery
Johnson Island Confederate Stockade Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 5, 2015
4. Johnson Island Confederate Stockade Cemetery
The marker can be seen on the inside of the fence.
are at the center of the marker. They have captions of “Confederate Stockade Cemetery, c. 1901.” and “The cemetery after the headstones were placed, pre-1910.” Both are from the Sandusky Library Archives Research Center. A photo at the lower left depicts “Unveiling ĎThe Lookoutí statue in 1910.” Finally, a c. 1905 portrait of Mary Patton Hudson appears at the bottom of the marker with a caption of “Mrs. Hudson sent this photograph to Commissioner Elliott, ĎSo he would know who he was talking to.í ”
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
 
The Lookout image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 5, 2015
5. The Lookout
This statue of a Confederate soldier stands watch at Johnson's Island Confederate Cemetery. As stated on the marker, it was erected in 1910.
Gates of the Confederate Stockade Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 5, 2015
6. Gates of the Confederate Stockade Cemetery
Confederate Graves image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 5, 2015
7. Confederate Graves
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 5, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 205 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on August 5, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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