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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Gordonís Decisive Attack

 
 
Gordon's Decisive Attack Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
1. Gordon's Decisive Attack Marker
Inscription. 3:00-4:30 p.m. July 9, 1864

So profuse was the flow of blood from the killed and wounded of both sides of these forces that it reddened the stream [on the Thomas Farm] for more than 100 yards below.
Maj. Gen. John B. Gordon

The first Confederate troops to cross the Monocacy River had been repulsed by the Federals massing across the Thomas farm. Then Maj. Gen. John B. Gordon's infantry emerged over the crest of Brooks Hill and with rebel yells and flying banners, swept down the hill toward the farm.

Gordon ordered his three brigades to attack sequentially from right to left. Union volleys ravaged the first brigade and bloodied the second. But the third brigade and other Confederate units drove the Federals off the Thomas farm and forced them into a general retreat toward Gambrill Mill.
 
Erected by Monocacy National Battlefield
National Parks Service.
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 39° 21.287′ N, 77° 23.681′ W. Marker was near Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker was on Monocacy National Park Service Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Located on the service road leading to the Worthington Farm (tour stop three).
Gordonís Decisive Attack Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 12, 2011
2. Gordonís Decisive Attack Marker
This photo looks east in the direction of the Thomas Farm and Gordon's advance. The view of the farm is blocked by I-270, which bisects the Monocacy Battlefield.
The stop is reached by turning north off Baker Valley Road after crossing under the I 270 overpasses. The marker stands between the service road and I-270. Marker was in this post office area: Frederick MD 21704, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Thick of the Battle (was approx. ľ mile away but has been reported missing. ); Thomas Farm (approx. ľ mile away); Final Attack (approx. ľ mile away); Federal Retreat (approx. ľ mile away); Civilians Under Siege (approx. ľ mile away); History of the Monocacy River Valley (approx. 0.4 miles away); Clustered Spires of Frederick (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Battle That Saved Washington (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frederick.
 
More about this marker. On the left is a portrait of "Georgia's John B. Gordon" who "was a gallant, determined, and inspiring leader - just what the Confederates needed at the critical point in the Battle of Monocacy." On the right is a portrait of "Union Brig. Gen. James B. Rickets," who "moved quickly across the Thomas farm to confront Gordon's flanking movement. His division suffered heavy losses but did stall the Confederates." Between the portraits is a tactical battle map.
 
Regarding Gordonís Decisive Attack.
Battle Map image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
3. Battle Map
Note how modern I-270 bisects the battlefield at this point.
The Monocacy Battlefield, while otherwise rather pristine compared to other major battlefields, is bisected by US Interstate 270 at this point. The highway creates an unnatural line between the fighting on the Thomas Farm and the Confederate advance from the Worthington Farm/Brooks' Hill.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Monocacy. National Parks Service site. (Submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Monocacy Battlefield Markers. This marker is among several describing the battle of Monocacy, to "tour" the battlefield see the related markers. (Submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Marker along the Service Road image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
4. Marker along the Service Road
Note the guard rail for the interstate on the right. At the time of the battle of course neither the interstate or the tree line existed. This section of the battlefield was open, rolling farm land.
Gordonís Decisive Attack Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 25, 2009
5. Gordonís Decisive Attack Marker
Brooks Hill and Gordon's Advance image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 26, 2007
6. Brooks Hill and Gordon's Advance
Gordon's division moved up this valley at the foot of Brooks Hill to attack the Federal lines. The valley is named for Baker's Farm which stood just at the base of Brooks Hill.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,588 times since then and 70 times this year. Last updated on October 1, 2015, by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia. Photos:   1. submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on April 23, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4. submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5. submitted on August 9, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   6. submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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