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Clarksburg in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Women on the Homefront in Montgomery County

1861 – 1865

 
 
Women on the Homefront in Montgomery County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 8, 2015
1. Women on the Homefront in Montgomery County Marker
Inscription. During the Civil War, most women attempted to live “normally,” maintaining homes, attending to children, and even taking over traditional male responsibilities on the farm. Yet the war brought severe hardships to most absent family men, limited access to supplies, and a shortage of labor.

Many of the domestic skills women practiced at home played a vital role in the form of volunteerism during the Civil War. Cooking meals, mending clothes, and tending to wounds were just a few examples of the acts of benevolence that comforted soldiers during the depths of despair. Alice D. Nourse remembered how local women aided Union troops stationed in Seneca suffering from typhoid fever: “My mother, with other ladies of the community, used to take the sick men such delicacies as they could, that their illness might be made a little more bearable.”

Montgomery County women held mixed views on the war and chose to champion both Federal and southern causes. Days after the firing at Fort Sumner, some women demonstrated their support of the rebel cause:

‘The flag of the Southern Confederacy made by the ladies of Rockville is now flying from the court-house. We had a demonstration on Saturday night in honor of Virginia secession. Abraham Lincoln was burnt in effigy.’ — Exerpt
Women on the Homefront in Montgomery County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 8, 2015
2. Women on the Homefront in Montgomery County Marker
from Baltimore Sun, 24 April 1861

Regardless of which side they supported, women endured severe hardships during these years. Solace was often found in the practice of their religious beliefs. Attendance at regular services sometimes presented a challenge. As a result, large religious revivals flourished, especially in the Hyattstown area. An 1863 advertisement announced that one such meeting was “highly increasing in interest.” That excitement continued after the war, when Americans rejoiced in the end of combat. Eleanor and David Zeigler, experienced inn keepers, prepared lodgings for nearly 300 who attended an August 1865 revival held only 400 yards away from their home. The 1805 Zeigler house still stands here today. — Baltimore Sun, 1 December 1863
 
Erected by Montgomery County Department of Parks.
 
Location. 39° 16.341′ N, 77° 18.469′ W. Marker is in Clarksburg, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker is on North Frederick Road (Maryland Route 355) 0.1 miles north of Prescott Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 25321 N Frederick Rd, Clarksburg MD 20871, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker
Our Women in the War image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
3. Our Women in the War
By Winslow Homer, 6 September 1864
Image Used on Marker
, measured as the crow flies. Our Daily Bread (approx. 0.6 miles away); Hyattstown Mill (approx. 0.6 miles away); Hyattstown (approx. 0.6 miles away); A Real Field of Dreams (approx. 0.8 miles away); Welcome to Froggy Hollow (approx. 1.7 miles away); 1862 Antietam Campaign (approx. 2.8 miles away); Mt. Ephraim Crossroads (approx. 2.8 miles away); Tavern Life at Dowden's Ordinary (approx. 2.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Clarksburg.
 
Also see . . .  Little Bennett Regional Park - Trails and Historic sites. Montgomery County Department of Parks (Submitted on November 10, 2015.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Mourning image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
4. Mourning
Tintype of a woman mourning holding a photograph of an unidentified Confederate Soldier
Tintype Used on Marker
Unknown African American Woman image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
5. Unknown African American Woman
c. 1850 — 1870
Ambrotype Used on Marker
Fugitive Slaves image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 8, 2015
6. Fugitive Slaves
Fugitive Slaves known as “contraband,&rdquo worked for the Union Army as nurses, cooks, laundresses, and laborers.
Close-up of photo on marker
Red Lion Camp Meeting image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
7. Red Lion Camp Meeting
The natural setting of the outdoor camp meeting allowed for larger groups of people, particularly women to have a religious awakening (or experience).
Image Used on Marker
Zeigler Log House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 8, 2015
8. Zeigler Log House
The rear structure of the house at 25321 North Frederick Rd was built in 1805.
Zeigler Log House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 8, 2015
9. Zeigler Log House
The Front section was added in the mid-19th Century.
Zeigler Log House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 8, 2015
10. Zeigler Log House
The house and grounds are now part of Little Bennett Park.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 10, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 191 times since then and 37 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on November 10, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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