Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de México, Mexico — The Central Highlands
 

Favor request…and talent for the gods

Solicitud de favores…y dones para los dioses

 
 
Favor request…and talent for the gods Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, November 2, 2015
1. Favor request…and talent for the gods Marker
Inscription.
Muchos pueblos mesoamericanos acostumbraban colocar ofrendas tanto para clausurar un edificio, como para construirlo; y este es el caso de una ofrenda encontrada aquí para consagra una nueva edificación.

Los arqueólogos encontraron en 1998 una gran cista o caja de piedra (hecha de sillares de cantera rosa) con diversos objetos en su interior: un carapacho de tortuga utilizado como teponaxtle (tambor), objetos de madera a manera de cetros con forma de serpiente y una “mariposa” articulada que se asocian con el culto a Tláloc.

También se encontraron numerosos cuchillos de obsidiana y pedernal, espinas de maguey para auto sacrificios, trozos de copal (resina aromática) y una cuenta de piedra verde al centro de la caja.

Para fortalecer la nueva construcción del Templo Mayor también se colocaron dos cráneos humanos con sus vertebras cervicales.

Pie de dibujo:
Objetos encontrados durante las excavaciones arqueológicas
Dibjuo: Salvador Guilliem Arroyo y Saturnino Valledo

English:
Many Mesoamerican town have the custom to put offerings when closing down a building structure as well as when building one, that is the case here of an offering found here in order to consecrate a new building.

In 1998, archaeologists found a Cista or box full of rocks (made
Favor request…and talent for the gods Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, November 2, 2015
2. Favor request…and talent for the gods Marker
The marker is on the left at the far end of this walkway on the northeastern corner of the Templo Mayor ruins with the Templo de Santiago Apostol in the background.
of blocks of stone of pink quarry) with many different objects on the inside: a turtle shell used as a “teponaxtle” (drum), wooden objects like scepters in the shape of a snake and an assembled butterfly that is associated with the cult to Tláloc.

Many knives made of obsidian and flint were also found as well as maguey plant thorns for self-sacrifice, bits of “copal” (aromatic tree resin) and a green stone bead at center part of the box.

To fortify the new construction of the Templo Mayor, two human skulls along with the vertebra were put in.

English translation of the caption:
Objects found during the archeological excavations.
Drawing: Salvador Guilliem Arroyo and Saturnino Vallejo
 
Location. 19° 27.082′ N, 99° 8.234′ W. Marker is in Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de México. Touch for map. The marker is at the Tlatelolco Archeological Site on Eje Central near the intersection with Avenida Ricardo Flores Magón.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Coyolxauhqui: The dismembered goddess (a few steps from this marker); Battle of Tlatelolco (a few steps from this marker); Stage 1 of the Templo Mayor de Mexico Tlatelolco (within shouting distance of this marker); Santiago Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Tzompantli altar (“flag of heads”) of the north (within shouting distance of this marker); Templo Mayor: a temple built eight times (within shouting distance of this marker); Tlatelolco’s great temple (“Templo Mayor”): A mirrored image of Tenochtitlan (within shouting distance of this marker); From peaceful convent to bellicose military barracks (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ciudad de Mexico.
 
Categories. AnthropologyMan-Made Features
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 4, 2016, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. This page has been viewed 241 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 4, 2016, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.
Paid Advertisement