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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Ciudad de Mexico, Distrito Federal, Mexico — The Central Highlands
 

Momoztli: a neighborhood altar

Momoztli: un altar de barrio

 
 
Momoztli: a neighborhood altar Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, November 2, 2015
1. Momoztli: a neighborhood altar Marker
Inscription.
En principio se creyó que este edificio era un Tlechtemalacatl, o altar de sacrificio gladiatorio. Es decir, una estructura en la cual un guerrero enemigo o prisionero de otro pueblo era amarrado de una pierna y se enfrentaba a un guerrero local para celebrar un combate ritual. Sin embargo a sus características no apoyan dicha función.
En la actualidad, los arqueólogos consideran que este edificio fue en realidad un momoztli o altar de barrio, un lugar donde la población podía acceder y dejar ofrendas a los dioses.
En muchas ciudades contemporáneas, existen pequeños altares e imágenes de santos o vírgenes que tienen una función semejante: son altares de barrio.

Pie de dibujos:
Resina de copal
Bracero ceremonial
Grupos de personas de los alrededores llegaban a este tipo de altares a dejar sus ofrendas, consistiendo algunas de ellas en copal: resina aromática utilizada en Mesoamérica.

English:
At first, it was believed that this building was a Tlechtemalacatl, or an altar for gladiator sacrifice – in other words, a structure on which an enemy warrior and a prisoner from another town were tied by one leg and would confront a local warrior to engage in ritual combat. However, its characteristics do not coincide with that purpose.
Archeologists currently believe
Momoztli: a neighborhood altar Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, November 2, 2015
2. Momoztli: a neighborhood altar Marker
The altar can be seen in the background.
that this building was actually a momoztli or neighbor altar, a place the populace could access and leave offerings for the gods.
In many Mexican contemporary cities, there are small altars and images of saints or virgins that share a similar function: they are neighbor altars.

English translation of captions:
Copal resin
Ceremonial incense burner
Groups of persons from nearby neighborhoods came to these altars in order to leave their offerings, usually consisting of copal: an aromatic resin used in Mesoamerica.
 
Location. 19° 27.108′ N, 99° 8.214′ W. Marker is in Ciudad de Mexico, Distrito Federal. Touch for map. The marker is at the Tlatelolco Archeological Site on Eje Central near the intersection with Avenida Ricardo Flores Magón.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Tzompantli altar (“flag of heads”) of the north (a few steps from this marker); Walls and roads: limits and communication (within shouting distance of this marker); The Reign of Cuauhtemoctzin (within shouting distance of this marker); Battle of Tlatelolco (within shouting distance of this marker); Favor request…and talent for the gods (within shouting distance of this marker); Tlatelolco Massacre of October 2, 1968 (within shouting distance of this marker); Coyolxauhqui: The dismembered goddess (within shouting distance of this marker); Church of Santiago (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ciudad de Mexico.
 
Categories. AnthropologyMan-Made Features
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 4, 2016, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. This page has been viewed 241 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 4, 2016, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.
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